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BACHELOR OF ARTS HONOURS IN GEOGRAPHY

 

“Geography is the study of places and the relationships between people and their environments. Geographers explore both the physical properties of Earth’s surface and the human societies spread across it. They also examine how human culture interacts with the natural environment, and the way in which the locations and places can have an impact on people.

Geography seeks to understand where things are found, why they are there, and how they develop and change over time”

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES (PLOs)

After successful completion, the Bachelor of Arts Honours in Geography degree offered by the Department of Geography, student will be able to achieve following Programs Learning Outcomes (PLOs); 

  • Interpret the theories, philosophies, and concepts in the discipline of Geography,
  • Articulate the themes of spatial patterns, the interrelationship between people and places, and the interactions between nature and society,
  • Explain and distinguish differences among the various methodologies used in geographic research and analysis,
  • Analyze, evaluate, and interpret geographic data and/or research, in particular by using Geographical Information System,
  • Identify and assess how geographic concepts apply in the workplace and in everyday life to solve real-world problems.

MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION

Sinhala/ English


CREDIT DISTRIBUTION

Bachelor of Arts Honours in Geography is a four-year degree program which consists of eight (08) semesters. To be eligible for the degree a student should obtain not less than hundred and twenty (120) credits including thirty (30) credits in first year and ninety (90) credits in year 2, 3 and 4. The credit structure is given below.

 

Credit Distribution

Year/ Level

 Semester

 Type of course units

 Total credits

 Core

 Optional*

 Auxiliary

 Total

 Semester total

 Year Total

 1

 I

 15

 -

 -

 15

 15

 30

 II

 15

 -

 -

 15

 15

 2

 I

 13

 04

 02

 19

 15

 30

 II

 12

 06

 02

 20

 15

 3

 I

 15

 -

 02

 17

 15

 30

 II

 15

 -

 02

 17

 15

 4

 I

 12

 06

 02

 20

 15

 30

 II

 15

 -

 -

 15

 15

Total credits

 112

 16

 10

 138

 120

 120

*Student should select one course unit out of the given course unit, then the selected optional course units considered as core unit.    

 

COURSE OUTLINE

CODE

COURSE UNITS

TYPE

CREDITS

REMARKS

 LEVEL 2 – SEMESTER 1

GEOG 21414

Principles of Cartography

C

4

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 21423

Principles of Geomorphology

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 21433

Population Geography

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 21443

Climatology

C

3

Moderate revision to the existence content

GEOG 21452

Environmental Geography^

C/O

2

Newly introduced

GEOG 21462

Health Geography^^

C/O

2

Newly introduced

GEOG 21472/ DELT 21572

English for the World

A

2

From the Department of English Language Teaching (DELT)

 LEVEL 2 – SEMESTER 2

GEOG 22413

Bio Geography 

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 22423/

DVST 22423

Agrarian Transformation

 

C

 

3

 

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 22433

Statistics for Geography  

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 22443

Basics of Geographical Information Systems

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 22453

 

Economic Geography of the Contemporary World+

C/O

 

3

 

Major revision to the existence content

GEOG 22463

Legal Geography++

C/O

3

Newly introduced

GEOG 22472/

DVST 22462

Career Planning and Development

A

2

Modified with Survival Skills for Career Planning

LEVEL 3 – SEMESTER 1

GEOG 31414/

DVST 31434

Geography of Sri Lanka  

 

C

 

4

 

Moderate revisions to the existence content

GEOG 31423

Soil Geography

C

3

Newly introduced

GEOG 31433

Climate Change and Human Behavior

C

Newly introduced

GEOG 31443

Urban Geography 

C

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 31452

Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

C

Newly introduced 

GEOG 31462

Community Development Practices

A

2

Newly introduce

LEVEL 3 –  SEMESTER 2

GEOG 32413

Philosophy of Geography

C

3

Moderate revisions to the existence Content

GEOG 32423

Tourism Geography  

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 32433

Research Methods in Geography

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 32443/

DVST 32433

Advanced Geographical Information Systems

C

3

Newly introduce

GEOG 32453/ DVST 32453

Institutional Training/ Internship

C

 

3

 

Minor revisions to the existence content

GEOG 32462/

DVST 32462

Critical Thinking

A

2

Newly introduced

LEVEL 4 – SEMESTER 1

GEOG 41413/

DVST 41413

Land Use Planning   

C

3

Moderate revisions to the existence content

GEOG 41423

Cultural Geography  

C

3

Moderate revisions to the existence content

GEOG 41433

Disaster Management

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 41543

Hydrology and Water Management

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 41453

/DVST 41453

Rural Development#

C/O

3

Moderate revisions to the existence content

GEOG 41463/

DVST 41463

Urban Planning and Development##

C/O

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 41472/

DVST 41472

Academic Writing

A

2

Newly introduced

LEVEL 4 – SEMESTER 2

GEOG 42412/ DVST 42412

Sustainable Development

C

2

Newly introduced

GEOG 42423

Political Geography  

C

3

Minor revision to the existence content

GEOG 42432

Regional Studies: India and China

C

2

Major revision to the existence content

GEOG 43448/ DVST 43448

Dissertation

C

8

No change to the existence content

Note; Students should select one course unit either from ^/^^, +/++ or #/ ##  out of the given course units at each levels.

 

COURSE CONTENTS

LEVEL 2 – SEMESTER 1

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 21414

Course Name

Principles of Cartography

Credit Value

04

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

60

110

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Explain the nature, principles and theories of cartography,

·       Interpret Sri Lanka’s topographic maps at various scales,

·       Demonstrate the cartographic skills in both topographic and thematic maps,

·       Analyze slope and aerial photographs,

·       Recognize the way of build maps by map projections,

·       Apply cartographic techniques to represent physical and human geographic features and draw thematic maps that will allow them to apply these knowledge and skills to everyday life.  

Course Content:

  • History, Definitions, Scope, Objectives and profession of Cartography
  • Map elements with special reference to scales (Different linear scales, Enlargement & reduction and Area calculation)
  • Coordinate systems; Latitudes and longitudes,  National grid systems (XY Coordinates)

·       Map projections and properties; Cylindrical, Conical, Azimuthal projections and Standard map projections,

  • Contours and common features of map
  • Profiles (Super imposed, projected and composite), Slope and slope analysis; Smith, Henry & Raze and Robinson
  • Visualization techniques in cartography: Topographic maps, Thematic maps, Graphs and diagrams,
  • Interpretation of Aerial Photograph
  • Representation of meteorological and climate data
  • Introduction of surveying; Different types of land survey and instruments, Objectives and importance of surveying. Classification of surveys. Principles of surveying.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Practical, Computer based skills on graphical representation, Individual and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Class/Online test, Practical work/ e-Book, Group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Class/Online test 10, Practical book 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Anson, R. W., (1984), Basic Cartography for Students and Technicians, Volume 1 and Volume 2, International Cartographic Association.

Mark Harrower, Anthony C. Robinson, Robert E. Roth and Ben Sheesely., (2011), Cartography, Free online E-Textbook, Available on;   https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280599704_Free_E-Textbook_Cartography_20

Monkhouse, F. J. & Wilkinson H. R., (1994), Map & Diagram, Methuen, London.

Survey Department. (2007), National Atlas of Sri Lanka, 2nd Edition, Colombo, Sri Lanka.

Vitarana, M. Kanthi., (2007), Cartography, Sarasavi Publishers.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG  21423

Course Name

Principles of Geomorphology

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

30

90

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Explain the earth as a terrestrial object,

·       Describe the composition of the earth and recognize the different landforms of the earth's  surface within a human-environmental framework,

·       Demonstrate the dynamic nature of geomorphologic characteristics and express the impact of land forms on human activities,

·       Identify the consequences of the geomorphologic processes and the ways of controlling negative impacts of geomorphic process. 

Course Content:

  • Subject of Geomorphology: Introduction
  • Composition of earth-crust
  • Minerals, rocks, soils and soil classifications
  • Weathering and mass movement processes
  • Endogenic and exogenetic forces: Earthquakes and tsunami
  • Continental drift, plate tectonics and evolution of different orders of landforms
  • Volcanic and structural landforms
  • Concepts of geomorphic cycles and denudation process
  • Erosion cycles- running water, waves, wind, glaciers and Karst  and related landforms
  • Geomorphology of  Sri Lanka :  Coastal Zone, peneplain and upcountry
  • Geological history of the earth
  • Relationship between climate, regolith, denudation process, landforms and human activities.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Field based activities, Blended learning and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Group work, Field based activities and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Mid-term  quiz 15, Field activity based assignment and presentation 20, & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Anderson, R.S., The Little Book of Geomorphology – freely available on; from:http://instaar.colorado.edu/~andersrs/The_little_book_010708_print.pdf

Chorley, R., Schumm, S. and Sugden, D.E. (1994): Geomorphology, Methuen, London.

Christopherson, Robert W., (2011), Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography, 8 Ed., Macmillan Publishing Company.

Grotzinger, J., Jordan, T., Press, F. and  Siever, R.,  2007, Understanding Earth (5th ed.), W.H. Freeman and Co.,  New York.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 21433

Course Name

Population Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

 

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course unit the student will be able to;

·       Discuss the dynamic and key component of Population Geography,

·       Explain the demographic processes and its determinants affecting these demographic patterns with relate to regional interpretation,

·       Examine the population related issues in spatial context 

·       Distinguish suitable population policies which provide social and economic, demographical issues.

·       Construct the connection between population, environment and development.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to Population Geography (Concept, Definitions, Scope and Evolution of the subject)
  • Components and elements of population concept

·       Population dynamics and characteristics; Fertility, Mortality, Migration

  • Basic theories and Debates (Malthusian, The Optimum Theory of Population, Marxian perspectives, Cornucopian, Bucharest and Paul Ehrlich)
  • Spatial and temporal patterns of Demographic process.
  • Population problems in spatial context: Sri Lanka as well as other regions of the world
  • Population policies:  Types of population policies. Natal and anti-national population policies
  • Population Vs development and environment (Case Study)

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Classroom discussions, Blended learning, Demonstration and hands–on activities. 

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Group work/ Individual Assignment and presentation and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Class test/ Quiz 15, Group work/ Individual assignment and presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Bailey, Adrian, (2005), Making Population Geography (Human Geography in the Making)

Bhende A. and Kanitkar T.,(2000), Principles of Population Studies, Himalaya Publishing House. Holly R. Barcus. H.R and Halfacree. K, (2017), An Introduction to Population Geographies Lives Across Space. Published August 31, 2017 by Routledge. ISBN 9780415569958.  

Newbold K. B., (2009), Population Geography: Tools and Issues, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers

Peters, Gary L. and Robert P. Larkin, (2008), Population Geography: Problems, Concepts, and Prospects

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 21443

Course Name

Climatology

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Recognize the importance of climate as the main parameter of the abiotic environment,

·       Define the scope of climatology and components of the climate system,

·       Demonstrate the global patterns of climate and the processes that shape them,

·       Dramatize atmospheric conditions differ in the different regions in the world,

·       Interpret synoptic meteorology and atmospheric teleconnection and explain the impact of human activities on the earth-atmospheric system,

·       Classify the climatic characteristics of Sri Lanka.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to the study of climatology and its scope,
  • Atmospheric composition (Stratification and atmospheric composition, Gas equation of state and  Ozone layer)
  • Solar radiation balance (Sun characteristics, Stefan-Boltzmann law, Wien's law, practical application shortwave and longwave radiation, Biological effects of radiation (UV, PAR, IR) and Radiation balance of active surface)
  • Weather elements, factors effects to climate change and ideal gas laws
  • Energy balance subsystem surface-atmosphere,
  • Climatic classifications: (Koppen and Thornthwaite)
  • Atmospheric moisture: water vapor, humidity measurements, relative & absolute humidity, process of cloud formation, cloud classification and precipitation,
  • Evapotranspiration (Evaporation, Transpiration and Interception)
  • Atmosphere circulation (Air pressure, Primary (general), Secondary (cyclones, anticyclones), Tertiary circulation,
  • Synoptic meteorology: air mases and fronts, tropical and extra-tropical cyclones and regional weather patterns
  • Climate/ Whether of Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Classroom discussions, Blended learning, Demonstration and hands–on activities. 

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Assignment, Group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Class test 10, Tutorial 10, Assignment 15 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Aguado, E. and Burt, J. E. (2007), Understanding Weather and Climate. 4th edition, Person /Prentice Hall.

Bridgman, H. A. and Oliver, J. E. (2006), The Global climate System: Patterns, Processes and Teleconnections

Lutgens, F. K., Tarbuck, E. J. and Tasa, D. (2009), The Atmosphere: An Introduction to meteorology.   Prentice Hall. Englewood cliffs, New Jersey.

Oliver, J. E. and Hidorem, J. J. (2002) Climatology: An Atmospheric Science. Pearson Education, New Delhi.

Robert V. Rohli  and Anthony J. Vega, (2007),  Climatology,  Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Rohil, R. V. and Anthony J. V. (2007), Climatology. 2nd Edition.

 

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 21452

Course Name

Environmental Geography^

Credit Value

02

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

-

70

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course student will be able to;

·       Understand the human-environment interactions and the application of knowledge and skills to solve environmental related problems,

·       Identify the environmental systems, processes and issues at local, national and global level,

·       Recognize generic conceptual and methodological methods to maintain environmental standards and real world practices,

·       Ability to clarify environmental management in relation to the major principles of sustainable development of the country.

Course Content:

  • Concept and scope, theories and process of environmental Geography
  • Human-environment interaction and issues: Historical progression and adaptation
  • Carrying capacity
  • Environmental problem in Tropical, Temperature and Polar ecosystem (Air and water pollution, soil pollution, water use and management, aquatic ecosystems, energy and climate change, biodiversity and solid waste manage)
  • Environmental standards and Policies at Local, National and Global level: Environmental impact assessment (EIA), Initial Environmental Assessment (IEA) and Polluter Pay Principle (PPP),
  • Policies and practices of environmental management which is leading to environmental sustainability of Sri Lanka. 
  • A case study on environment issue/s and identify mitigation/ adaptation strategies.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Practical, Individual/ Class Discussions and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Small group project report and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details: Quiz 15, Group work and Presentation 20 & Class attendance 05

Theory

60

Practical

-

Other (specify)

-

Recommended Reading:

Chandna R. C., (2002), Environmental Geography, Kalyani, Ludhiana.

Goudie A., (2001), The Nature of the Environment, Blackwell, Oxford.

Saxena, H. M. (2017), Environmental Geography (Third Edition), Rawat Publication, Calcutta.

Singh S., (1997), Environmental Geography, Prayag Pustak Bhawan. Allahabad.

 

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 21462

Course Name

Health Geography ^^

Credit Value

02

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

-

70

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Discuss the scope and approach of Health Geography

·       Review of the connection between population, health and environment

·       Examine the Spatial dimensions and dispersion of health issues

Course Content:

  • Introduction Health Geography:  of Scope, Process and Perspectives
  • Approaches of Health Geography

·       Spatial and Temporal dynamics of diseases: diseases agents, transmission process, and types 

  • Ecology of human diseases:   Relationship between environment and human health
  • Health education for human well-being: prevention,  rehabilitation and palliative care
  • Primary health care for sustainable social lifestyle: Indoor-outdoor pollution, water, waste management, nutrition, maintaining BMI, prevention of having toxic foods.
  • Indigenous knowledge: practices of health care and disparities of rituals, believes, costumes and traditions.
  • Diseases mapping: Diffusion and predictions
  • Prospect of human wellbeing: Health care system and its contribute for the national development in Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Blended learning, Group work and Guest talk.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance/ Continuous Assessments/ Assignment, Group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz 15, Individual / Group Assignment 20   & Class attendance 05.

Theory

60

Practical

-

Other (specify)

-

Recommended Reading:

Anthamatten, P and Hazen, H (2011). An introduction to the Geography of Health. Routledge Publication, New York : USA.

Kanaroglou, P. Delmelle, E and Paez, A (2015). Spatial Analysis in Health Geography.  Ashgate Publishing Limited, England.

Luginaah, I and Kerr, R.B (2015). Geographies of Health and Development. Hennry Ling Limited, Dorset Press., United Kingdom. 

Mead,M.S, and Emch,M. (2010). Medical Geography (3rd ed). USA; Guilford press and publish. Guilford Publication, New York : USA.

 

 

Level

Level II

Course Code

DELT 21512/ GEOG 21472

Course Name

English for the World

Credit Value

2

Type

Auxiliary

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30hrs

(2 lecture hours X 15 weeks)

15hrs (Activities related to language skills development and assignments

1 hour X 15 weeks)

55hrs (Reading, listening & viewing, peer collaborative learning, LMS Forums 3-4 hours X 15 weeks)

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course unit, student will be able to;

ILO 1: compare and contrast (idiomatic and spelling) differences between American English and English in Britain

ILO 2: describe and practice phonological, morphological, and syntactic features of Sri Lankan English

ILO 3: discuss global issues and their impact on Sri Lanka

ILO 4: identify academic writing style and edit

ILO 5: debate/Discuss contemporary issues

ILO 6: use ‘politically correct’ language

  ILO 7: comment on data and use related language appropriately

Course Content

World Englishes

·       Discuss different views about different Englishes

·       Identify spelling differences between American and British English

·       Use idioms and expressions in meaningful sentences

·       Listen to song about different views on English/ Watch video Sri Lankan English

·       Read texts on features of Sri Lankan English

·       Make notes on standard and non-standard variety

·       Paragraph writing with topic sentences

·       Appreciate and analyze short story in Sri Lankan English

·       Write an appreciation of literature and character discussion– 20%

Current Issues

·       Discuss contemporary social issues

·       Use reported speech in talking about current issues

·       Express critical views on current issues

·       News report on an incident (report using a poster/PowerPoint – individual) 20%

Inclusive Language 

·       Discuss the need for inclusivity in society based on Video clip

·       Discuss issues related to using politically correct terminology

Identify and use politically correct language in all types of sentences -     Listening activity 10%

Data Commentary

·          Identify vocabulary related to graph descriptions

·          Use tenses related to graph

·          Identify the format of data commentary

·          Academic Writing Style

·          Identify the use of nouns and verbs in academic language

·          Practice nominalization

·         Practice editing

Teaching/ Learning Methods:

Task-based language learning; presentations, discussions, role play, student presentations

Assessment Strategy:

Poster presentation, Listening, Essay, Individual news report, End of Semester Exam

Continuous Assessment

50%

Final Assessment

50%

Details:

Literary appreciation 10, Character description 10 Individual news report 20 & Listening 10.

Theory

 

50

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

 Recommended Reading:

Gunesekera, M. (2005). The Post-colonial identity of Sri Lankan English. Colombo: Katha Publishers.

Heyer, S. (1996). True stories in the news: A beginning reader (3rd ed.). UK: Pearson Publishers. Long, W. J. (2015). English literature: Its history and its significance for the life of the English speaking word. UK: Rupa Publisher.

Swales, J. M., & Feak, C. B. (2004). Academic writing for graduate students: Essential tasks and skills (Vol. 1). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Thomson, A. J., & Martinet, A. V. (2010). A practical English grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

 

LEVEL 2 – SEMESTER 2

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22413

Course Name

Bio Geography   

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

15

95

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Explain the  perspective of Biogeography,

·       Review  factors governing biodiversity and ecosystem dynamics,

·       Recognize the factors governing and limiting a species' distribution, evolution and inversion

·       Identify the major and minor biomes,

·       Practice to plant identification and explain the plant morphology.

Course Content:

  • Scope, definitions and concepts of biogeography
  • Nature of biosphere and its subsystems and plant evolution
  • Eco-systems and environmental limitations: light, heat, energy, moisture, wind and topography
  • Biodiversity; definitions and scales, degradation and conservation
  • Bio geographical processes and patterns, factors influencing distribution of plants and animals;
  • Ecological biogeography: organisms and habitats, ecological niches, biological environments, bio climatology, topography and life, energy flow, food chain and food web, bio cycles, bio synthesis and bio degradation
  • Plant systems in the biosphere;  plant succession, climax, and marine and inland biogeography of Sri Lanka
  • Plant systems: diversity, grouping, associations, speciation and extinction, dispersal, colonization, invasive plant and invasive plant communities in Sri Lanka.
  • Animal systems: compositions, characteristics and communities
  • Problems of deforestation and conservation; social forestry; agro-forestry; wild life and eco system services
  • Techniques and methods in biogeography; plant morphology, field surveys and mapping techniques
  • Conservation biogeography: conserving species, communities and eco systems

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, field work, discussion, blended learning and group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Plant album, Presentation, Individual/group work base on filed study and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz/ Tutorial 10, Plant album 10, Field base assignment 15 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Cox Barry C., Moore Peter D., 1993, Biogeography an ecological and evolutionary approach, Fifth Edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications.

Furley Peter A., Newey Walter W., 1983, Geography of the Biosphere, first published, Butterworth & Co. Ltd.

Huggett Richard John, 2004, Fundamentals of Biogeography (Second Edition), Taylor & Francis e-Library in USA.

MacDonald, Glen, 2003, Biogeography; Introduction to space, time and, life, John wiley & Sons inc, USA.

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22423/ DVST 32423

Course Name

Agrarian Transformation

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

25

85

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Demonstrate the concept, evolution and development of Agriculture,

·       Recognize the role of agricultural determinants towards the changing agricultural systems,

·       Evaluate the Green Revolution, its impacts and aftermath

·       Differentiate the modern agriculture,

·       Identify and analyses different agricultural practices in Sri Lanka.

Course Content:

  • Scope of the Agrarian Transformation
  • Agricultural evolution: Plant and animal domestication (cultigens)
  • World agricultural systems and classifications
  • Models and theories in agrarian studies (Von Thunen’s Models and Jonasson’s Model)
  • Changing agricultural systems (Subsistence to Modern)

·       Peasant Colonization of Sri Lanka,

·       Land tenure and land reforms,

  • Dimensions of Agricultural Development: Productivity, Diversification and Commercialization
  • Role of food and agricultural sector development of Sri Lanka; Employments, Food security and GDP contribution
  • Fragmentation of land holdings and Land grabbing
  • Dimensions of Green revolution and aftermath; Smart agriculture
  • Changes in government agricultural policies
  • Sustainable agriculture: Green economy, Agri-business and Contact farming.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Class discussions/ Guest talk, Field exercise based on a case study and individual/ group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance/ Continuous assessments/ Field based individual/ group activities and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 10, Participation of field work and Group work/ Assignment 25 & Class attendance 05

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Balasubramanian, A.,  Outline of Agricultural Geography, Available on the web: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309784057_Outline_of_Agricultural_Geography

Chorley Richard J. (1970),  Models, paradigms and new geography in Socio-economic Models in Geography,  Peter, London, Methuen & Co. Ltd.

Hagget. P., (1965),  Location Analysis in Human Geography,  London Edward Arnold (publisher) Ltd.

Majid Hssain, (2002), Systematic Agricultural Geography,  Rawat Publication, Jaipur & New  Delhi.

Peiris, G.H., (1996), Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, Macmillan India Ltd, New Delhi

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22433

Course Name

Statistics for Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

30

90

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Provide statistical skills enabling them to intelligently collect, analyze and interpret data mainly relevant to the subject of geography,

·       Distinguish among the different concepts of and draw upon the appropriate calculations associated with each concept to solve given statistics problems,

·       Demonstrate ability in solving problems by using information and data with SPSS software,

·       Application of quantitative techniques for geographical studies.

·       Decision making through inductive reasoning.

Course Content:

  • Introduction to Statistics for Geography; Scope, definition and importance,
  • Data; Sources, types and qualities
  • Measurements; Various types of averages, Normal frequency distribution, Curve and its uses,
  • Descriptive statistics; Central tendency, variability, Z-scores,
  • Measures of dispersion and concentration: Range, quartile deviation, mean deviation,

standard deviation; coefficient of variation, Lorenz Curve and Gini’s Coefficient; location

Quotient.

  • Histogram and Measures of location,
  • Probability and probability distributions,
  • Sampling; Types of sampling, Random sampling, Sampling distribution, Geographic sampling and sampling error,
  • Correlation and regression analysis,
  • Statistical significance, Standard error of difference, Significance test in small samples, Student’s ‘t’ test, z test,
  • Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals,
  • Application of quantitative techniques for geographical studies.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Practical work, Computer based learning, Blended learning and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous Assessment, Assignments, Group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 10, Tutorial 10, Assignment 15 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Hammond. R.,(1978), Quantitative Techniques in Geography: An Introduction 2nd Edition,  Oxford University Press.

Peter J. Taylor., (2018), Quantitative Methods in Geography: An Introduction to Spatial Analysis, Rawat Publication.

Rogerson, Peter A., (2006), Statistical Methods for Geography: A Student's Guide, SAGE Publications Ltd, London.

Van Maanen, John, (1979), Quantitative Methodology, SAGE Publications, New Delhi.

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22443

Course Name

Basics of Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

15

 60

75

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

  • Identify and explain the fundamentals and concepts of GIS,
  • Describe the components of  GIS and familiarizing the ArcGIS, and Open Source software,
  • Construct geospatial data; making maps, visualizing and interpreting by using GIS.

Course Content:

·       Introduction to GIS: Scope, definitions and objectives

·       Main components of GIS

·       Data models; spatial and non-spatial data, raster and vector data

·       Spatial and non spatial data; characteristics, standards, capturing, processing and visualizing techniques

·       Application of map elements; primary and secondary map elements

·       Create topographic maps and thematic maps using GIS; Georeferencing, Digitizing, and Geoprocessing

·       Fields of GIS Application; Map making and interpreting

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Computer lab practical, Individual/ group work and Blended learning techniques.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Practical test and end semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 10, Midterm Practical Test  25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

40

Practical

Exam

20

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Burrough P. A. and McDonnell R. A., 2000: Principles of Geographical Information Systems–Spatial Information Systems and Geostatistics, Oxford University Press.

Chang K.-T., 2009: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, McGraw-Hill. Chrisman

Clarke K. C., 2001: Getting Started with Geographic Information Systems, Prentice Hall.

DeMers M. N., 2000: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley & Sons

http://dl.booktolearn.com/ebooks2/science/geosciences/9781259929649_Introduction_to_Geographic_Information_
Systems_9th_Edition_25de.pdf

https://www.esri.com/en-us/arcgis/about-arcgis/overview

Nicholas, R, 1996, Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

 

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22453

Course Name

Economic Geography of the Contemporary World +

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course student will be able to;

·       Identify four main theoretical perspectives in economic geography,

·       Describe key economic-geographical concepts of space, place and scale and recognize their key issues,

·       Explain and apply key concepts and theoretical approaches in economic geography,

·       Discuss the importance of economic geography for understanding globalizing world,

·       Discuss policy options for overcoming inequality and uneven development in the globalizing world.

Course Content

  • Key concepts of economic geography: Space, Place and Scale,
  • Classification of economic activity; Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Quaternary and Quinary,
  • Factors affecting location of Economic Activity with special reference to Agriculture (Von Thunen theory), Industry (Weber’s theory) and service (Central place theory),
  • Different approaches in economic geography; Neo-classical location theory, Behavioral approach, Structuralize and Post-structuralize approaches,
  • Economic geographies of the contemporary world; Geographies of economic globalization (investment, production, trade, consumption) in agriculture, manufacturing and services
  • Economic geography and policy challenges; uneven development and inequality in the global age,
  • Regions and regional cooperation within the world economy.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Guest talk, Class discussions, Blended learning and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Group or Individual assignment and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz 15, Group/ Individual Assignment and presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Aoyama.Y, Murphy.J.J and Hanson.S (2011). Key Concept in Economic Geography. SAGE publication Ltd. London:UK.

Coe.M.N, Kelly.P.F and Yeung.C.W.H (2007). Economic Geography: A contemporary Introduction (3rd ED). Wiley Blackwell Publication. USA.

Kloodterman, C.R, Mamadouh, V, and Terhort, P (2018). Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham: UK.

Krugman.P (1993). Geography and Trade. Leurven University press, Leuven: Belgium.

Sexena.H.M (2013). Economic Geography.

   

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22463

Course Name

Legal Perspectives of Geography ++

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Describe the law and importance of environmental law,

·       Explain legal provisions that can be used to solve environmental problems,

·       Discuss to make aware general public on environmental law and

·       Indicate actively to protect and conserve environment.

Course content

·       Scope and definitions of the Legal Geography,

·       The legal aspects of the Geography; Law relating to the natural resources: attention will be given to water, soil, and mineral resources, fauna and flora, sea and marine resources, protected area, coastal resources and wetlands,

·       Law related to human activities (Constructions/Development) which effect to the equilibrium of the environment

·       Law relating to the human behaviors – waste disposal, misuse of natural resources

·       Environment and natural resources of Sri Lanka; The national environment Act, Coastal Resources Protection and Coast Conservation Act, Fisheries and aquatic resources Act, Forest ordinance in Sri Lanka, Marine pollution prevention Act, Mines and minerals Law, Geological survey and mines bureau Act, House and town development ordinance and Soil conservation Act,

·       International laws on environment;  Stockholm declaration of the United Nations conference on the human environment, Rio declaration on environment and development, Montreal protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer and  International plant protection convention.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Case Studies, Gust talk and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Case study based group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz/ Class test 15, Case study based group work and presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory 

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Blomley,  Nicholas,2001, The Legal Geographies Reader: Law, Power and Space 1st Edition, Wiley-

Blackwell Publisher, 108, Cowley Road, Oxford IJF, UK. ISBN-13: 978-0631220169

Braverman, I, Blomley, N and Keder, A. 2014, The Expanding Spaces of Law: A Timely Legal Geography,

Stanford University PressStanford Law Books, https://doi.org/ 10.2307/j.ctvqsdzbj

 Michael H. Martella, 2018, Fundamentals of the Law, https://milneopentextbooks.org/law-101- undamentals-of-the-law/

Perspectives and Methods, 1st Edition, eBook Published30 June 2020, Pub. Tayanah O’Donnell, Daniel F. Robinson, Josephine Gillespie, 2019, Legal Geography

nxvdr” ;s,la úfÊ;=x.”’ Y%S ,xldfõ mdßißl kS;s yd m%;sm;a;s” 2017” ohdjxY chfldä m%ldYlfhda” fld<U’

  

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 22472/ DVST 22462

Course Name

Career Planning and Development

Credit Value

02

Type

Auxiliary

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

25

15

60

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Demonstrate the value of developing personal attributes,

·       Examine the transferable skills to be acquired by the students during their university life,

·       Comprehension of these attributes and skills, it is expected that the students should be able to discover successful employment opportunities and a productive social life,

·       Prepare a successful career plan.

Course Content

·       Identify personal interests, skills, and values

·       Assessing personal goals, abilities, needs, values and interests

·       Time management, memory, reading, note- taking, testing techniques, and stress reduction

·       Models on career planning: John Holland’s Theory of Career Choice, Frank Parsons’s matching careers to talents, skills and personality Theory. 

·       SWOT and Gap Analysis for Career Planning and personality development

·       Facing the interviews for available positions

·       Plan and implement a program for Career development

·       Career counseling and mentoring

·       Taking appropriate action and decision-making

·       Understanding career pathways and career connections.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Individual application exercises, Group activities, Class discussions, Assignments and workshops.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Preparation of personal SWOT and Gap analysis, Career plan. End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Preparation of personal SWOT and Gap analysis 15, Career plan and presentation 20 & Class attendances 5.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other

(specify)

-

Recommended Reading:

Ashley, Roderic, (1998), Enhancing Your Employability, Oxford.

Raymond Gerson, (2012), Achieve Career Success: Discover and Get the Job You Want, 2nd Edition, Upbeat Press.

Smale, Bob and Julie Fowlie, 2008, How to Succeed at University: An Essential Guide to Academic Skills and Personal Development (Sage Study Skills Series)

Steven Garnesby, (2013), Career Planning & Development: The Path Towards Your Dream Job, Create Space Independent Publishing Platform.

Career theory and models. (n.d.). Retrieved July 21, 2020, Available on the web; https://www.careers.govt.nz/resources/career-practice/career-theory-models/ 

 

LEVEL 3 – SEMESTER 1

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31414/ DVST 31434

Course Name

Geography of Sri Lanka  

Credit Value

04

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

45

110

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Demonstrate key geographical phenomenon of Sri Lanka and its surrounding factors,

·       Inquiry in to temporal and special relationship with the development process in Sri Lanka,

·       Synthesize the changing patterns of geographical issues in a broader temporal and spatial scale and further analysis their causes and consequences,

·       Recognize with the suitable sustainable development approaches based on local and global resources.

Course Content

·       Scope of the Geography of Sri Lanka 

·       Physiography of Sri Lanka and geological background and geological history,

·       Concepts and theories on formation of landscape

·       Land resources; Soil, rocks and mineral resources of Sri Lanka

·       Land use, Land development, and Agriculture

·       Water resource: Rainfall, Evaporation and water balance, Run-off and river discharge, Circulation of groundwater, Irrigation and future water needs of the country

·       Eco-system; Eco-systems of Natural forest, Grassland, Wetlands, Forest and Bio-mass as energy resources

·       Natural hazards and disaster management; Drought and Dry weather, Floods, Cyclone, Seismic-see waves and Epidemics

·       Development disparity and Development priorities

·       Development challenges

·       Geo-political potentials and barriers

·       Sustainable development in Sri Lanka; Challenges and opportunities

Teaching / Learning Methods:

Lectures, Discussions, Case study based on field work and Blended learning.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Field based case studies, Inquiry-based/ problem-based discussions, assignment and semester end examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz/Class test 10, Participation of field work and group report with presentations 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory  

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other

(specify)

-

 

Recommended Readings:

Cooray, P. G. (1984). An Introduction to the Geology of Sri Lanka (Ceylon), 2nd revised edition, Colombo.

Grover, Paul, A, (1996). Economic Development and Social Change in Sri Lanka: Spatial and Policy Analysis, Manohan Publishers. New Delhi

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327221768_Sustainable_Sri_Lanka_2030_Vision_and_Strategic_Path

Johnson, B. L. C., and M. Le Scrivenor. (1981). Sri Lanka: Land, People, and Economy. London: Heinemann.

Lakshman, W.D, (1997). Dilemmas of Development: Fifty Years of Economic Change in Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka Association of Economists, Colombo.

Peiris, G.H., (1996). Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, Macmillan India Ltd, New Delhi

Peiris, G.H., (2006). Sri Lanka: Challenges of the New Millennium, Kandy Books, Kandy

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31423

Course Name

Soil Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

10

100

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Define the variety and complexity of soils and the ways in which soils are an integral component of the terrestrial ecosystem,

·       Apply technical terminology associated with the description and uses of soils,

·       Identify soil properties important to land use, environmental quality, and society/culture,

·       Demonstrate the skills required to make field observations and interpretations of soils for various uses,

·       Illustrate and use information from a variety of sources for land use planning and soil management decisions,

·       Interpret the impacts of land use and management decisions on soil productivity and sustainability, environmental and ecological health, and land degradation.

Course Content:

·       Scope, definitions, concepts of soil geography; Soil as a basic natural resource, Soil as a fact that regulate the human society and life in general,

·       Basic concepts of soil geography; Composition and genesis; Physical, chemical, and biological properties of Soil,

·       Soil Formation; Soil Physical Properties, Soil texture, textural classes, Soil consistence; Dispersion and workability of soils;

·       Soil structure – Genesis, types, Characterization and management of soil structure;

·       Soil water: content and potential, soil water retention, measurement of soil water content soil-water constants,

·       Identification of Soil types, Soil classification and mapping;

·       Soil Erosion and Soil pollution, Soil conservation techniques

·       Soil testing; Aggregate analysis - dry and wet, Measurement of soil-water content by different methods, Measurement of soil-water potential by using tension-meter and gypsum

  • Relationships between soil and environmental quality
  • Soil management practices in Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Practical/ lab work, Blended learning and Group work.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Field based assignment, Group work and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz/Class room test 10, Field based assignment/ Practical 15, Class assignment 10 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Donald Steila and  Thomas E. Pond ( 1976)The Geography of Soils: Formation, Distribution, and Management, 2nd Edition, Prime-Books.

James G. Cruickshan, (1981), Soil Geography,  David & Charles Publication.

Wagh., G. S. (2017), Soil Testing Manual, Nirali Prakashan Publishers.

Panabokke, C.R. (2006), Soil Science: The Soil of Ceylon and Use of Fertilizer, C.A.A.S. Books on agriculture, Ceylon Association for the Advancement of science-1967.

Wickrama, K.A. S. (2008), Pasa Pilibanda Hadinveemak, Author Publication.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31433

Course Name

Climate Change and Human Behavior

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Examine how the Earth’s climate system works and summarize general atmosphere circulation patterns,

·       Identify the effect of climate change and the impact on climate change and environment made by human activities,

·       Analyze figures to understand natural and human-influenced drivers of our climate system and implications,

·       Choose mitigation and adaptation are needed to face present and future challenges,

·       Collect related policies, technologies and management of low carbon and environmental sustainability in Sri Lanka and different countries in the world.

Course Content:

·       Nature of Climate Change: Climate Change; Green House effect and Gases

  • Global worming: CO2 Emissions; Human Emissions of CO2, Different Concerns of Rich and Poor Countries, The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in the United Nations
  • The Earth’s Carbon cycle and Reservoirs

·       Impact of Climate Change: Economic activities (Agriculture, Industry and Services) and people,  Water,  Flora and Fauna

  • Ocean circulation pattern and climatic oscillation (El-Nino and La-Nino)
  • Changing behavior of the different communities
  • Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation: South Asia and Sri Lanka
  • Actions on climate change mitigation: COPs and Sri Lanka
  • A case study on climate change adaptation/ mitigation or living with

·       International Legal and Policy Framework for Climate Change.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Classroom discussions, Problem based learning, Question and Answering sessions and Group work

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Quiz, Assignments, Presentation and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 15, Class room test 10, Assignment 10 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Andrew Dessler, Introduction to Modern Climate Change, Cambridge Uni. Press.

Brian C. Black; Gary J. Weisel, Global Warming, Available on:   https://www.questia.com/read /124060145/global-warming

Introductory e-Course on Climate Change, UN: CC Learn, The One Climate Change Learning Partnership, Available on the web:  https://www.uncclearn.org/sites/default/files/introductory_e-course_on_climate_change_syllabus_1.pdf 

John Houghton, Global Warming, (2015), The Complete Briefing, 5th Edition, Cambridge Univ. Press.

 United Nation, The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Available on the web:  https://www.ipcc.ch/



Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31443

Course Name

Urban Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

20

100

Intended Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Identify the main factors and theories of urbanization,

·       Develop skills for identifying, interpreting, analyzing, and synthesizing the urban environment with reference to modern trends of urban planning and development,

·       Investigate and describe the geographies of dynamic urban systems in holistic approach,

·       Explain the problems of contemporary urbanization pattern in developed and developing world,

·       Synthesize and inquiry the contemporary issues and trends of planning and development process of urbanization with the case studies of the selected cites of Sri Lanka.

Course Content

·       Nature and scope, concept, origin, evolution and different approaches of urbanization

·       Origin of urban settlements, Factors, stages, and characteristics influenced the historical evolution of Cities in ancient, medieval, modern and post-modern periods

·       Theories of urban evolution and growth (Hydraulic theory and Economic theory)

·       City economy, city culture, power, politics, and urban governance

·       Livability: Planning, the Urban Physical Environment and Living Conditions, Ranking of cities and their theoretical background

·       Urban hierarchies and morphology of Cities; August Lösch’s theory

·       Urban issues: Housing, slums, civic amenities and other

·       Modern concepts of City planning, smart cities, green cities, carbon-neutral cities

·       Contemporary trends in cities and urbanization of Sri Lanka

·       A case study in selected cities of Sri Lanka concerning a problem/s, planning, or development.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Group Discussions, Field observation with a case study based on selected city and blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance/ tutorial, problem based group work, inquiry based group activities, Assignment and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term tests 10, Participation of field work and Group work/ Assignment with presentation:  25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Advances in Geographical and Environmental Studies, Springer.

Fainstein, S, and S Campbell, eds. (2002). Readings in Urban Theory, 2nd Edi. Oxford: Blackwell.

Kaplan, D., Holloway, S. (2014). Urban Geography, 3rd ed, Wiley Publication.

Knox, P. L. and McCarthy, L. (2005). Urbanization: An introduction to Urban Geography, Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Prentice Hall

Singh, R.B. (Ed.) (2015). Urban development, challenges, risks and resilience in Asian megacities.

Tim, S.; Kempen, R. V, (2019).  Handbook of Urban Geography, Edward Elgar Publishing.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31452

Course Name

Remote Sensing and Global Positioning Systems

Credit Value

02

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

15

30

55

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

  • Demonstrate Remote sensing (RS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) process
  • Identify and use the different types of satellite imageries
  • Recognize different types of GPS devices and their accuracy levels
  • Apply, integrate, and develop models with Geo-spatial data through the GIS.

Course Content:

  • Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positing Systems (GPS); Scope, objectives and importance
  • Fundamentals of RS; Satellite remote sensing process (Orbits and Swaths) radiation, electromagnetic spectrum,  active and passive RS
  • Satellite image processing and enhancing (Characteristics, Histogram, False Color Composite (FCC), True Color Composite (TCC)
  • Classification of Satellite images; Supervised Classification, Unsupervised Classification
  • Introduction to GPS; definitions, process of GPS satellite systems, types of GPS based on accuracy levels and capacity, Techniques for maintaining accuracy, and  familiarizing with the GPS devices

·       Gathering data using GPS and applications.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Computer lab practical, Case study and Blended learning.

Assessment Strategy:

Assignment, Group / Individual Assignment and Semester end examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term test 15, Group / Individual Assignment 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other  (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Ahahmed el-rabbany, 2020, Introduction to GPS, the Global Positioning System, Artech house, inc. , Bostern, London

Fazal, Shahab, 2008, GIS Basics: New age international (P) limited publishers, New Delhi

French T. Gregory, 1996, An introduction to the Global Positioning System, GeoResearch, inc. USA

James B., Campbell and Randolph H. Wynne, 2011: Introduction to Remote Sensing, Guildford Press.

Jensen J. R., 2004: Introductory Digital Image Processing: A Remote Sensing Perspective, Prentice Hall.

United States Geological Survey (USGS) Available on; https://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/

  

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 31462

Course Name

Community Development Practices  

Credit Value

02

Type

Auxiliary

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

15

45

40

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to

  • Define the key principles of community development practices and determine its process,
  • Experience in participating a community/ community development  practices/ program,
  • Enhance understanding of groups and communities,
  • Creative ways to work with community,

·       Practices of civic/ student leaders/ members, activists and involved member to improve various aspects of communities, typically aiming to build stronger and more resilient the selected community/ ties.

Course Content:

·       Scope and principles  of the Community Development Practices

·       The role and value of community-based organizations and its member

·       The community development process and strategies,

·       Government and community development 

·       Community development approaches

·       Disasters and community development

·       Sustainability of community development  practices

  • Community development organizations & community engagement
  • Involvement and experiences from a selected community development project/ program.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Interactive lecture, discussion, blended learning and independent project

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance and Group/ Individual project report based on the personal experience/ involvement.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz 10, Group/ Individual Project proposal on community development and presentation 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

 

-

Practical

 

 

-

 

Other (specify)

Group/ Individual project report and presentation

60

Recommended Reading:

Centre for Vocational and Continuing Education, (2014), Basic Concepts of Community Development- Course Book, The University of the South Pacific Online available on the web:  http://oasis.col.org/bitstream/handle/11599/1008/1.Basic_Concepts_of_Community_Development_Course_Book.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

Rhonda Phillips and Robert H. Pittman, (2009), An Introduction to Community Development, Routledge Publication. Available on the web:  https://loomio-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/uploads/a857276f9762676b869e7112c396824c/An%20Introduction%20to%
20Community%20Development.pdf

 

LEVEL 3 – SEMESTER 2

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32413

Course Name

Philosophy of Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Demonstrate the different ideas of geographical thoughts in different periods and regions,

·       Articulate their interpretations of the contemporary world and there practices by the theoretical foundation of Geography,

·       Construct philosophical thoughts and discourses in terms of the temporal and spatial phenomenon,

·       Enhance the ability of critical thinking and creativity to understand and deal with incidents to get reasonable conclusions with future visions.

·       Apply the philosophy of geography in the process of researching and hypothesizing the solutions for the problems related to human-environmental interactions.

Course Content

·       Introduction to Philosophy of Geography; nature, perspectives and themes

·       Approaches of Geography; Regional Geography and Systematic Geography

·       History and evolution of Geography; Classical era; (Greek and Roman), Medieval era (Europe – Dark age and Arab) and Modern era

·       Impact of Darwinism and Marxism into the discipline of Geography

·       Trends of Geography in the Post World War-II period: Quantitative revolution, systems approach Radicalism, Feminism; Towards Post Modernism, neo marxism– Changing Concept of Space, and scale in Geography,

·       Dualism and Dichotomies

·       Towards postmodernism: Geography in the 21st century

·       Quantitative revolution and its impact, Behaviouralism, Systems Approach Changing the concept of space with special reference to Harvey

·       Trends in thoughts in Geography, and Future visions of Geography.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Discussions, blended learning, inquiry based group activities, independent learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Assignment, Inquiry based case studies, Group discussions, Presentations, and Semester end examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz / Midterm tests 10, Group Assignment with presentation 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Bonnett A., (2008), What is Geography? SAGE Publication.

Dikshit R. D., (1997), Geographical Thought: A Contextual History of Ideas, Prentice– Hall India.

Hartshone R., (1959), Perspectives of Nature of Geography, Rand MacNally and Co.

Holt-Jensen A., (2011), Geography: History and Its Concepts: A Students Guide, SAGE Publication.

Husain, M., (2015. Evolution of Geographical Thought, 6th ed, RAWAT Publications.

Johnston R. J., (1997), Geography and Geographers, Anglo-American Human Geography since 1945, Arnold, London.

Sudeepta Adhikari (2015), Textbook Fundamentals of Geographical Thought, Orient Blackswan Private Limited

  

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32423

Course Name

Tourism Geography 

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Recognize the Geography of tourism, tourism and tourism industry,

·       Demonstration of fundamental concepts of geography, including space, place and scale and be able to apply each to the field of tourism studies,

·       Justify the elements, types and impacts of tourism,

·       Determine the local and the international organization that deal with the tourism and tourism industry,

·       Clarify the tourism development policy and strategies of Sri Lanka.

Course Content:

·       Overview of Tourism Geography: Geography and Geographies of tourism

·       Key concepts of Tourism Geography: Tourism, Leisure, Mobility, Recreations, Tourism inversion, Tourism motivation etc.

·       Geographic foundation of tourism: historical, transport, physical and human geography

·       Elements of tourism: Nature and characteristics, typology of tourism, classification of tourists.

·       Theories of Tourism Geography: Core-periphery, Location Theory, Tourism life cycle model,

·       Types of tourism: Inter–regional and intra–regional tourism, inbound and outbound tourism, domestic, international tourism.

·       Forms of tourism: religious, adventure, health, business and eco-tourism, agritourist etc.

·       Impact of Tourism: positive and negative (environmental, social and economic)

·       International and local tourism organizations: Origin, location and functions of World Tourism Organization (WTO), World Tourism &Travel Council (WTTC) and Sri Lanka Tourism Development Authority (SLTDA),

·       Development of the Sustainable Tourism: policy and strategies of Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Class Room Discussions, Debate and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Presentation and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term test 15, Assignment and presentation 20 and Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Cooper, C. and Hall, C.M. (2008), Contemporary Tourism: An International Approach, Butterworth-Heinemann.

Guruge Kingsly, (2009), The Impact of International Tourism: The case of Sri Lanka, Published by the University of Kelaniya.

Mowforth, M. and Munt, I., (2015), Tourism and sustainability: Development, globalization and new tourism in the third world. Routledge.

Nelson, V., (2017), An introduction to the geography of tourism. Rowman & Littlefield.

Sharma, K.K. (2005), Tourism and Development, Sarup & Sons.

Williams, S. and Lew, A.A., (2014), Tourism geography: Critical understandings of place, space and experience. Routledge.

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32433

Course Name

Research Methods in Geography

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

15

95

Intended Learning Outcomes:

By undertaking this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Determine and discuss the role and importance of research in the field of Geography,

·       Demonstrate the way in which research is designed and conducted,

·       Discuss the complex issues inherent in selecting a research problem and selecting an appropriate research design,

·       Analyze the data and  testing hypothesis,

·       Apply the best research instruments to be utilized in the pursuit of goals in their own research projects and the quest for the solution of a research problem.

Course Content:

·       Introduction of Research; Philosophy, Objectives, Utility and Importance of Research.

·       Concept of theory: deductive and inductive theory and Characteristics of scientific method

·       Literature review, Ethics and plagiarism

·       Problem Identification and Formulation; Research Problem and Research Question

·       Research Design; Characteristics and Types

·       Qualitative and Quantitative Research; measurement, causality, generalization, replication

·       Sampling; Concepts of Statistical Population, Sample, Sampling Frame, Sampling Error, Sample Size. Characteristics of a good sample.

Types of Sample; Simple Random Sample, Systematic Sample, Stratified Random Sample & Multi-stage sampling. Determining size of the sample

·       Data collection, Tabulation, Analysis and Interpretation

·       Measurement Issues and Hypothesis

·       Use of tools / techniques for Research; use of statistical software 

  • Preparation of synopsis and making verbal presentations.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Class discussions and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance/ Continuous assessments/ Research proposal and presentation and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term test 10, Synopsis with presentation 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Daniel Montello and Paul Sutton., (2012), An Introduction to Scientific Research Methods in Geography and Environmental Studies, SAGE Publication.

John P. Jones and Basil Gomez., (2010), Research Methods in Geography: A Critical Introduction, Wiley-Blackwell Publication, Oxford. 

Kumar, Ranjith, 1996, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Uwe Flick, (2010), An Introduction to Quantitative Research SAGE Publication.

O¾uisß, t,A, tï'" (2019), iudÔh úoHd m¾fhaIK" f.◊dvf.a m%ldYlfhda" urodk" fld<U'

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32443/ DVST 32433

Course Name

Advanced Geographical Information System

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

 45

75

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

  • Competence to manipulate GIS related data
  • Use the GIS as a tool to analyze spatial data from different fields using GIS, RS and GPS applications
  • Analyze the spatial distribution of phenomena and provide meaningful analysis of spatial attributes
  • Demonstrate of GIS analysis to address applied problems independently
  • Apply, integrate, and develop models with Geo-spatial data through the GIS for sustainable solutions

Course Content:

·       Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS); Scope and objectives

·       Geo-processing and model design

·       Spatial analysis of interpolation and extrapolation techniques; IDW, Spline, ing, Thiessen polygon

·       3D analysis; Digital Elevation Model(DEM), Tranguler Irregular Network(TIN) 

·       Data and information processing techniques;  creating geodatabase, Shape files, Thematic maps, Topographic maps, Excel Data

·       Introduction to Geospatial open source software

·       Intergraded applications/approaches of Geo -informatics (GIS, RS, GPS); Processing, mapping and analysis

·       Independent project on Geo-informatics

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, computer lab practical, class discussions, blended learning and case study based group work,

Assessment Strategy:

Mid-term practical test, Assignment, Semester end practical examination and Group/ Individual project

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 10, Mid-term Practical Test 25 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

 

-

Practical Exam

 

40

Other  (specify)

Individual project &  presentation

20

Recommended Reading:

Nicolas B., Clement M., Mehrez Z., 2018, QGIS and applications in agriculture and forest, ISTE Ltd. London ,UK    

Zhilin Li, Jun chen, Emmanual B., 2008, Advance in photogrammetry, remote sensing and spatial information sciences, 2008. ISPRS congress book, Tailor and francis group, London, UK

Zhu X., 2016, GIS for environmental applications: a practical approach, Routledge.

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32453/ DVST 32453

Course Name

Institutional Training/ Internship

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

10

240

-

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit/ program, the students will be able to;

·       Get an opportunity of learning to work in a selected institution that is consistent with the field of Geography, under the supervision of an employer and a coordinating lecturer,

·       Gain self-confidence, self-understanding and interpersonal skills and they will develop work competencies for a specific occupation,

·       Demonstrate their familiarity with intellectual skills, transferable skills and excellent personal attributes,   

·       Experience also helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn and provides an opportunity to build professional networks,

·       Apply knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work setting.

Course Content:

.  The internship would essentially include the “total work experience” on the following;

  • Gain knowledge and practical experience within the institute
  • Skills on problem solving and decision making
  • Planning, service learning and customer care
  • Keeping records and use of resources
  • IT skills and communication skills
  • Community service, social skills, nurturing relationships and volunteering
  • Leadership, responsible citizenship and truthfulness
  • Contributions to group efforts and teamwork
  • Time-management
  • Self-motivation, attendance and punctuality
  • Coping with uncertainty, flexibility and conflict resolution
  • Develop a greater understanding about career options while more clearly defining personal career goals.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures (Guidelines), Guest talk and Institutional training/ On the Job Training (OJT)

Assessment Strategy:

Time sheet, Internship experiences report and Interview. 

Continuous Assessment

00%

Final Assessment

100%

Details;

None

Theory

 

-

Practical

-

Other (specify)

Time sheet, Internship Experience Report and interview

(50+40+10 =100)

Recommended Reading:

Frederick H. Sweitzer, (2014), Successful Internship - 4th edition, Cole Publishing Co.

 

Semester

2nd  Semester

Course Code

GEOG 32462/ DVST 32462

Course Name

Critical Thinking

Credit Value

02

Type

Auxiliary

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

15

50

35

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Practice for logical discussions, and justify decisions using geographic perspectives, 

·       Prepare for critical and productive group discussion effectively,

·       Improve the logical and coherent arguments to utilize creative techniques in Geography,

·       Convince the writing and speaking processes through invention, organization, drafting, revising, editing, and presenting the creative works.

Course Content

·     Concept, fundamentals, techniques, and process of creative thinking

·     Interpretation in critical thinking; Information seeking, interpretation, analysis, synthesizing, inference, evaluation, explanation, deduction, conclusions, logic, and assumptions

·     Significance of critical thinking for making decisions

·     Elements of Bloom’s taxonomy and critical thinking skills toolkit for creative graduates

·     Criteria for sound arguments and making conclusions

·     Identify common errors of thought, barriers and break the barriers

·     The community of practice; Sharing resources, knowledge, practices, and purposes

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, discussions, blended learning and participatory learning.

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Activity-based and problem-based group discussions, small group works and presentations and semester-end examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term tests 15 , Group work/ Assignment with presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

-

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

Individual report and presentation

60

Recommended Readings:

Abrahmi, P., Bernard, R., Borokhovski, D., and Freeman, J., (2010), Critical Thinking about Geography,  Pap/Cdr edition,  Walch Education, New York 

Chatfield, T., (2018) Critical Thinking: Your Guide to Effective Argument, Successful Analysis and Independent Study, Sage, London

Crang, M., Thrift, N., (2000), Thinking Space (Critical Geographies), Routledge, London

Critical Thinking Skills,  Lumen Learning, Available on the web:  https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-collegesuccess-lumen1/chapter/critical-thinking-skills/

 

LEVEL 4 – SEMESTER 1

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41413/ DVST 41413

Course Name

Land Use Planning   

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

35

30

85

Intended Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Appraise the land as a basic resource

·       Examine the need for land use planning,

·       Outline the policies, legal and institutional contexts of land use planning,

·       Construct the relationship with institutes which related to land use planning in Sri Lanka

·       Define and practice the sustainable answers to land use related issues in Sri Lanka,

Course Content

·       Introduction to Land-use Planning.

·       Concepts, theories, approaches, and strategies of land use, and land use planning.

·       Land as a basic resource, Function of land, political interference on land, Land rent, Intensity of land use, and Market behavior of Land use.

·       Historical evolution and background factors of Land-use Planning.

·       Governance, ownership, and management of land and land resources,

·       Land use classification and Land Classification systems,

·       Land Evaluation for Land use planning-FAO Framework, Participatory land evaluation.

·       Land qualities and characteristics as diagnostic criteria, Land use Indices, Land use requirements.

·       Legal and institutional set-up for the land use planning process in Sri Lanka

·       Present system and regulations of land use planning in Sri Lanka,

·       Land use issues and sustainable resolutions of Sri Lanka

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Practical training at the Land Use Policy Planning Department (LUPPD), PRA at the field and blended learning, problem and inquiry-based group activities

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments/ Group/ individual work based field-based case studies,  presentation, End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Mid-term test 10, group activities 10, individual/ group assignment and presentation 15 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Carlos Loures, (2019). Land-Use Planning and Land-Use Change [Open access peer-reviewed], Available on the web;  https://www.intechopen.com/books/land-use-assessing-the-past-envisioning-the-future/introductory-chapter-land-use-planning-and-land-use-change-as-catalysts-of-sustainable-development

M.A. Silberstein and Maser, C., (2013). Land-Use Planning for Sustainable Development, Routledge Publication.

Land use policy planning department of Sri Lanka; https://www.nsdi.gov.lk/land-use-policy-planning-department

Dent D.L. Deshpande S.B.,(1993). Land Evaluation for Land Use Planning, Indian Council for Agricultural Research, Nagpur

Mandal, R.B.,(1990). Land Utilization; Theory and Practice.

FAO, (1976). A Framework for Land Evaluation, Rome.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41423

Course Name

Cultural Geography  

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course unit the student will be able to;

·       Examine the relationships between culture and place,

·       Distinguish the theories in cultural geography,

·       Investigate the spatial distributions of cultures and the processes that led to these distributions,

·       Examine the various aspects of human culture are expressed spatially, including language, religion, economic organization, forms of government, and use of land.

Course Content:

·       Definition, scope and content of Cultural Geography

·       Origin and Evolution of culture with environment

·       Component of culture; identity norms, values and practices.

·       Characteristics of culture and Cultural themes

·       Mapping cultural geography

·       Cultural Realm; Cultural Diffusion, Cultural Segregation and Cultural Diversity, Diffusion of major world religions and languages.

·       Theoretical approaches: Cultural Materialism, Marxism (Centrality of class), Cultural feminism.

·       Geography of religion, Linguistics and Ethnicity,

·       Culture, Technology and Development

·       Races and racial groups of the world

·       Trans-nationalism and Trans – culturalism 

·       Multi-dimensions in cultural diversity of Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Video, Group Discussion and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Group/ Individual Assignment, Presentation and End semester examination.  

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 15, Group/ Individual assignment and presentation 20 & Class attendance 5.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Donald Mitchell, (2000), Cultural Geography: A Critical Introduction, Blackwell Publishers Ltd, USA.  

Mitchell, D. (2000), Cultural Geography-A Critical Introduction, Black Well.

Minca. C, (2013), The Cultural Geography of Landscape. Hungarian Geographical Bulletin.

Jordan-Bychkov, Terry, and Mona Domosh, (2003), The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography, New York: W.H. Freeman and Company.

Atkinson, D. Jackson, P, Sibley, D and Washbourne, N (2005). Cultural Geography A critical dictionary of key concepts.  I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd. London.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41433

Course Name

Disaster Management

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

25

95

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Outlining the concepts of hazards and disasters and the roles of phases of disaster management and issues concerning planning and policies,

·       Examining the disaster management plans and policies and  risk reduction strategies,

·       Investigate and manage the vulnerabilities through disaster management planning and policy-making,

·       Analyze the available data and geospatial techniques for measuring and mapping for managing the risk and vulnerability,

·       Practice the competencies to utilize mapping in awareness, mitigation planning, and forecasting for making adaptive and resilient communities.

Course Content

·       Conceptual background: Hazard and disasters, history, definitions and characterization of hazards, vulnerability and risk, disasters from historical perspective

  • Hazards and Disasters; Identification and classification, Risk and Vulnerability Analysis
  • Nature of different phases of disaster management and issues

·       Indicators and factors of disaster vulnerabilities (Natural, Physical, Social, Economic, Policies, and Governance) and Disaster management cycle

·       Identification of the different disaster-prone areas of Sri Lanka using temporal and spatial techniques

·       Risk Assessment, Vulnerability Analysis, and Risk Reduction

  • Disaster mitigation strategies and disaster preparedness and response
  • Measuring and mapping vulnerability and community resilience
  • Disaster management and response: crisis, recovery, and post-disaster management
  • Impact of natural disasters: direct and short-term impact, indirect and long-term consequences, disaster as an opportunity for sustainable development
  • Mitigation and policy strategies, Disaster management policy, Act, and plans of Sri Lanka

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Video, Discussions, Guest talk, Field visits, and blended learning, participating drills, and simulations

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous Assessments, inquiry-based Group/ Individual or group assignments on disaster case analysis and presentation and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term tests 15, Group assignment and presentations 20, Class attendance 05.

Theory 

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CFE-DMHA) (2017),  Sri Lanka Disaster Management Reference Handbook, Available on the web; https://reliefweb.int/report/sri-lanka/sri-lanka-disaster-management-reference-handbook-december-2017

Ministry of Disaster Management (2014), Sri Lanka Comprehensive Disaster Management Program, Available on the web;  http://www.disastermin.gov.lk/web/images/pdf/slcdmp%20english.pdf

Mrinalini Pandey, (2014), Disaster Management, Wiley India Pvt. Ltd. Publication.Uitto, J. I., Shaw R. (Edit.) (2016), Sustainable Development and Disaster Risk Reduction, Springer.

  

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41543

Course Name

Hydrology and Water Management

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

20

90

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Examine an overview of hydrology, its components such as precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, runoff, infiltration and, condensation and water management.

·       Use and interpretation of simple hydrologic models,

·       Identify spatial variation of water quality

·       Identify the water related issues and management practices

Course Content:

·       Hydrology: Definition and its importance, hydrological cycle, hydrological equations and its components,

·       Water for the world; Basic issues, Demand/supply and Trends,

·       Water uses: water pollution, water purification, rain water harvesting, water related health issues, water related low and ethics,

·       Irrigation: advantages and disadvantages, types of irrigation, classification of irrigation schemes, tank & lift irrigation, cascade systems, crop seasons and irrigation efficiency,

·       Water quality and water quality parameters; Biological, Physical and Chemical Parameter,

·       Precipitation: definition, forms, types of precipitation, intensity calculation, hydrograph, hyetograph and factors affecting precipitation,

·       Evapotranspiration: definition, the process, factors affecting evapotranspiration, water budget, energy budget, and measurement and management methods of evapotranspiration,

·       Infiltration: definition, factors affecting infiltration, (soil, water, plant) relationship, infiltration capacity calculation  and ground water

·       Runoff: definition, type of runoff, factors affecting runoff, runoff computation, flow measurements,

·       Watershed: causes, effects and importance of flood studies, factors affecting flood, stream ordering (with Maps), catchment management and conservation methods,

·       Managing water resources: Towards a sustainable future.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, discussions, water testing, field work, group work, and blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance/ Continuous assessments/ Presentation, field based assessment and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Quiz 10 , Group/ Individual Assignment 10, Field based Assignment and presentation 15 and Class attendance 5

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

-

Recommended Reading:

Bonell, M. Hufschmidt M.Mm, Gladwell J.S.,(2005), Hydrology and water management in the humid tropics, Cambridge university press, UK.

Brooks, K.N., Ffolloitt, P.F., Gregersen, H.M. and DeBano, L.F., (2003), Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds, 3rd Ed., Iowa State Press, USA.

Brutsaert, W., (2005), Hydrology an introduction, 5th Ed,. Cambridge university press, UK.

Reddy P. Jaya Rami, (2013), A Textbook of Hydrology, Third Edition, University Science Press, Laxmi Publications Pvt.Ltd.

Ward D. andy, Trimble w.Stanley, (2003), Environmental Hydrology, 2nd Ed., Lewis publications in USA

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41453/ DVST 41453

Course Name

Rural Development#

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

15

95

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Compare the concepts of rural development and their dynamic process,

·       Critically examine the key concepts and ground realities associated with the rural development process, measurements, and phases,

·       Analyze and synthesize the backwardness, poverty, and modernization in the rural sector n the developing world,

·       Criticize the challenges faced by the rural sector, and to recommend sustainable strategies to enhance the wellbeing of the rural livelihood in Sri Lanka.

Course Content

·       Concept, Nature, Scope and basic elements of rural development

·       Theories and models of rural development; Sectoral, Multi-sectoral, Territorial and Local

·       Causes of rural backwardness and poverty

·       Approaches to rural development in developing countries

·       Phases of rural development; Different approaches of community development, Integrated Rural Development, State-led to Market liberalization, Empowerment, Sustainable livelihood, and Poverty reduction, Public-private partnership for rural development 

·       Measurements of rural development progress; Economic, Social, political and Environment

·       Rural workforce and poverty; Push and Pull factors, Local governance, and rural development 

  • Modernization of agriculture: Changing rural livelihood, Impacts on micro-finance and sustainable livelihood
  • Labor market patterns, women’s participation, and rural development
  • Progress of rural development strategies of Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Field visit, field-based group work, discussions and blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Assignment based on rural development activity, and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz 15, Group assignment with presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Gary P. Green (ed), (2013). Handbook of Rural Development, Edwards Elgar Publication.

Krishnamurthy, J. (2000). Rural Development: Problems and Prospects, Rawat Publications.

Singh, K.; Shishodia, A. (2016). Rural Development: Principles, Policies, and Management, 4th ed, Sage.

Theodoridis, A., Ragkos, A., Salampasis, M. (Eds.) (2019). Innovative Approaches and Applications for Sustainable Rural Development, Springer, New York

William, T. A., Christopher, A. J. (2011). Rural Development: Concept and Recent Approaches, Rawat Publication, New Delhi.

 

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

GEOG 41463/ DVST 41463

Course Name

Urban Planning and Development##

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory/ Optional

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

40

15

95

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Critically examine the geographical perspectives, approaches to  explain the spatial patterns of development under the various circumstance,

·       Compare the concept of urban planning,

·       Critically analyze and to synthesize the theories and models of urban development,

·       Analyze the backward and forward linkages on development,

·       Outline the different measures for assessing urban development,

·       Decide the urban disparity and measures to overcome the disparity.

 Course Content

·       Regions: Concept, types, classification, and delineation

·       Urban planning: Types, principles, objectives, tools, and techniques

·       Concept of growth and development, growth versus development, sustainability and equity in development  (Efficiency versus equity in development)

·       Different doctrines of urban planning and development: Cumulative causation The neoclassical conception, Herbert A. Simion; Alfred Marshall, Vilfredo Pareto,  The Keynesian Conception; John Maynard, Keynes

·       Paul Samuelson,  The neo- Marxist conception;  The monetarist Conception; Milton Friedman

·       Indicators of urban development: Economic, demographic, and environmental

·       Human development approach in urban development: Concept and measurements

·       The pattern of urban development and regional disparity and diversity of Sri Lanka,

·       Forward-backward linkages, rural-urban relations and spatial organization for urban development

·       Challenges and measures for balanced urban planning and development in Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Guest talk, Discussions and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Desk review, Presentation and end semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Mid-term tests 15, Desk reviews and group presentations 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Thakur, R.R., Dutt, A.K., Thakur, S.K., Pomeroy, G.M. (Eds.) (2020).  Urban and Regional Planning and Development: 20th Century Forms and 21st Century Transformations, Springer, London

John Glasson.,(1978)An introduction to regional planning : Concepts, theory and practice ,London : Hutchinson,

Misra R.P.(1992),Regional Planning: Concepts, Techniques, Policies and Case Studies, Concept Publishing Company, India

Szirmai, Adam, (2005), An Introduction to the Dynamics of Socio-Economic Development, Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge.

  

Semester

1st Semester

Course Code

DVST 41472/ GEOG 41472

Course Name

Academic Writing

Credit Value

02

Type

Auxiliary

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

15

45

40

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Apprise writings of academics,

·       Integrate characteristics of academic wittings 

·       Produce knowledge on writing styles and writing formats

Course Content:

·       Scope and Definition of Academic Writing

·       Academic writing: purpose, audience, evidence, style and writing process

·       Characteristics of academic writing

·       Structure of a paragraph

·       Developing paragraphs into an article

·       Quality improving steps of a paragraph/article 

  • Developing academic vocabulary,
  • Reading and interpretation
  • Plagiarism and literature review
  • Writing research papers & academic essays
  • Formats of tables, graphs, map and figures
  • Citation styles 

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Video, Group activity and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendant, Individual read and interpretation, Short essay writing and Presentation.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz on vocabulary test 15, Short essay and presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Douglass, Frederick. (1845). Chapter VII: “Learning to Read and Write” from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Wtitten by Himself. Available on the web: http://sscwriting.kellimcbride.com/pol_ereader/pol_douglass_learning.pdf

Stephen Bailey Academic Writing A Handbook for International Students Third edition, Routledge. Available on the web:  https://www.kau.edu.sa/Files/0013287/Subjects/academic-writing-handbook-international-students-3rd-ed%20(2).pdf

අමරසිංහ"ta'Ô' ^2015&' උසස් විභාග සඳහා ලිඛිත පිළිතුරු සම්පාදන උපදෙස්" lතෘ ප්‍රකාශන'

  

LEVEL 4 – SEMESTER 2

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 42412/ DVST 42412

Course Name

Sustainable Development

Credit Value

02 

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

30

-

70

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Outline the concept of Sustainable Development (SD), the environmental, social and economic dimensions,

·       Discuss the conflicts which are involved in the SD concept on the national as well as on the global scale.

·       Familiar with potential strategic options for SD (efficiency, sufficiency),

·       Provide knowledge and skills to promote SD for lifestyle. 

Course Content

·       Introduction and History: Brundtland, Rio, SDGs

·       Basic Concepts, Strategies and Measurement

·       Sustainability and SD 

·       Sustainable development approaches and practices

·       Efficiency and Innovation, Green Growth and Rebound

·       Instruments for SD

·       Education focuses on Global Citizenship Education (GCED) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)

·       SD and sustainable lifestyles, human rights, gender equality, promotion of a culture of peace and non-violence for global citizenship

·       Geographical parameters for SD: Environmental degradation, Biodiversity, Climate Change.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Discussions, Debate and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Presentation and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Quiz 15, Assignment with presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Readings:

Strachan, J., Vigilance, C. (2008).  Sustainable Development in Small Island Developing States

Issues and Challenges, Commonwealth Secretariat, London.

Brundtland Commission Report (1987), Our Common Future, Oxford University Press.

Dalal-Clayton, B. and Bass, S. (2002), Sustainable Development Strategies: A Resource Book, Routledge

Peter R. Atsatt., (2006), An Introduction to Sustainable Development, EARTHSCAN

Peiris, G.H., (2006), Sri Lanka: Challenges of the New Millennium, Kandy Books, Kandy

Mohan Munasinghe,  Sustainable Sri Lanka 2030: Vision and Strategic Path, Available on the web:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/327221768_Sustainable_Sri_Lanka_2030_Vision_and_Strategic_Path

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 42423

Course Name

Political Geography  

Credit Value

03

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

45

-

105

Intended Learning Outcomes:

At the completion of this course unit the student will be able to;

·       Demonstrate the interconnectedness of geography and politics in the field of political geography,

·       Recognize the key concepts in contemporary political geography, including the state, the nation, territory, boundaries, power, and scale;

·       Analyze geographical factors and places which have impact on political decisions and changes.

·       Determine the contemporary geo-political issues.

·       Learn the geographical impacts of political decisions at variety of geographical scales,

Course Content:

·       Nature, Scope, Definitions, Development of political geography  

·       Themes of Political Geography: The study of Environmental relationship with politics, The study of National Power, The study of political region

·       Politics, Power and Political Geography: Nation, State and Territory as the central organizing principle of Political Geography

·       Evolution of Political Geography: Classical Phase, Modern Phase (1900 ‐ 1970) Postmodern Phase ‐ (After1970) 

·       Understanding social and political theories and concepts; The Prince (Niccolo Machiavelli), 1984 (George Orwell), The Wealth of Nations (Adam Smith), Das Kapital (Karl Marx), Orientalism (Edward Said)

·       Division of space, sovereignty and territoriality, frontiers, boundaries and regions, geo politics and power analysis

  • Divisions of global power, globalization and world systems

global geopolitics

  • US Geo-politics and impact of other nations : A rise of China
  • Environmental geopolitics :  Environmental security and sustainability
  • Spatial analysis of civil war, violence, terrorism and anti-racism
  • Geo political aspect of Sri Lanka.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Class discussions, Guest Speeches, Debates and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Continuous assessments, Group work and End semester examination

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details:

Essey15, Assignment base on group/ individual work with presentation 20 & Class attendance 05.

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-

Other (specify)

 

-

Recommended Reading:

Gallaher, Carolyn, Carl T Dahlman, Mary Gilmartin, and Alison Mountz, 2009, Key Concepts in Political Geography, SAGE Publications, 

Cox, Kevin R., Murray Low, and Jennifer Robinson, 2007, The SAGE Handbook of Political

Political Geography, 2nd Ed. by Joe Painter and Alex Jeffery, published by Sage in 2009 with a reprint in 2012 (ISBN 978-1-4129-0138-3).

Gnew, J. A., & Muscarà, L. (2012). Making Political Geography (Vol. 2nd ed). Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsebk&AN=442867

Fahrer, Chuck and Martin Ira Glassner, 2003, Political Geography

 

Semester

2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 42432

Course Name

Regional Studies: India and China

Credit Value

02

Type

Compulsory

Hourly Breakdown

Theory  

Practical

Independent Learning

30

-

70

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Identify the geographical fundamentals and perspective on contemporary India and China,

·       Study the multiple aspects of life in the world's most populous state: the People's Republic of China and India,

·       Sharpen critical thinking on the past and present of the both countries and how both the past and present have an impact on the world in order,

·       Examine the success of regional development strategies in both countries in their own context.

Course Content

·       Geographical fundamentals and perspective on contemporary India and China; History, Land and Resources,

·       Introduce China and India as Emerging Countries in Asia,

·       Unity and diversity; India and China,

·       Population dynamics; Size, Growth, Spatial pattern of distribution, Issues and Policies,

·       Culture and traditions,

·       Political, social and economic systems,

·       Development approaches and perspectives; Models and Plans,

·       Geographical implications; rising China and emerging India,

·       China and India: integration with world trade, transactions and production networks through   Belt and Road Initiative.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Lectures, Discussions, Guest talk and Blended learning

Assessment Strategy:

Class attendance, Group discussions, Continuous assessments, Presentation and End semester examination.

Continuous Assessment

40%

Final Assessment

60%

Details;

Quiz/ Mid-term tests 15, Assignment with presentation 20 &  Class attendance 05. 

Theory

 

60

Practical

 

-                 

Other (specify)

-

Recommended Readings:

Tregear, T.R. (2017). A Geography of China (Kindle Edition), Routledge, New York

Satish, D., (2016). Contemporary India: The New Text Edition (Kindle Edition), New Text, Delhi

Lu, Yang (2016). China-India Relations in the Contemporary World: Dynamics of national Identity and Interest, Routledge Advances in South Asian Studies, Routledge, London

Riccardo Crescenzi, Andrés Rodríguez and Michael Storper, (2012), The Territorial Dynamics of Innovation  in China and India, Available on line on the web; https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234045060_The_territorial_dynamics_of_innovation_in_China_and_India

Meredith, Robyn, (2007), The Elephant and the Dragon: the Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us,  W.W. Norton & Company Inc., New York.

 

Semester

1st and 2nd Semester

Course Code

GEOG 43448/  DVST 43448

Course Name

Dissertation

Credit Value

08

Type

Compulsory

 

Hourly Breakdown

Theory

Practical

Independent Learning

-

-

400

Intended Learning Outcomes:

After completion of this course unit, the students will be able to;

·       Demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained throughout the degree program and apply them to a specific research question,

·       Gain skills to formulate a research proposal which is based on a research question and justifying the methodology,

·       Search and summaries literature 

·       Enable students to carry out independent project.

Course Content: (This unit does not include lectures on formal topics)

·       The undergraduate dissertation/ project within the field of Geography is an individual study,

·       The dissertation/ project includes search and summary of literature,

·       Collection, tabulation and analysis of data and find solution for the research question,

·       The dissertation/ project is mastered under individual supervision,

·       The supervision includes how to perform a scientific study and how to orally and in writing present gathered data in good scientific manner,

·       Enable students to carry out independent project.

Teaching /Learning Methods:

Independent learning, Workshop and Individual guidance.

Assessment Strategy:

Research proposal, Workshop and Dissertation/ Project.

Continuous Assessment

20%

Final Assessment

80%

Details;

Attending to meet supervisor (at least 08 times) 10 and Viva voce 10.

Theory

-

Practical

-

Other (specify)

Dissertation/ Project

80

Recommended Reading:

Bryan Greetham, (2014), How to Write Your Undergraduate Dissertation (3rd Edition), Macmillan Publication.

Nicholas Walliman, (2013), Your Undergraduate Dissertation: The Essential Guide for Success, SAGE Publishing.

O¾uisß, t,A, tï'" (2019), iudÔh úoHd m¾fhaIK" f.◊dvf.a m%ldYlfhda" urodk" fld<U'

 

  

ANNEXURE

Criteria for BA Honors Degree

Academic Year - 2018/ 2019

  1. BA Honours Degree
    • BA Honours Degree consists of four levels.
    • A minimum of 30 credits at each level totaling to a minimum of 120 credits should be completed within all the four levels. A minimum of 90 credits of the said 120 credits should be obtained from the compulsory course units of the main subject of the BA Honours Degree program and 30 credits could be from the level one course units of the BA Degree.
    • A student can register for a minimum of 30 credits and a maximum of 40 credits at second, third and fourth levels. At these levels, it is not allowed to register for the BA General Degree course units of the subject selected for the special degree.
    • “C” or better grades should be obtained for the compulsory course units of the main subject of the BA Honours Degree program and for the 8 or 10 credits of the level one course units of the said main subject of the BA Degree.
    • “C” or better grades should be obtained for a minimum of 108 credits out of the registered course units.
    • The minimum GPA should be 2.00
    • “E” Grade should not be obtained for any registered course units and even the course units for which the student was absent, will be considered ‘E’ grades.
    • It is compulsory to complete the course unit relevant to the students’ faculty (either English for Humanities DELT 12252 or English for Social Sciences DELT 11212) offered by the DELT (Department of English Language Teaching).
    • All the above requirements should be completed within a period of a maximum of six academic years.
    • Grades below C (C-, D+, D, E) are considered failed grades.

 

  1. Grade Point Average (GPA)

For the BA Honours Degree, the GPA is rounded to the approximate two decimal points and a minimum of 120 credits for which better grades obtained are counted for the GPA.  At least 100 credits out of the said 120 credits should be from the compulsory course units of the main subject of the BA Honours Degree.

  1. Awarding Class
    • First Class
      • “C” or better grades should be obtained for all the registered course units.
      • “A” or better grades should be obtained for a minimum of 70% out of the total credits of the compulsory course units of the main subject of BA Honours Degree.
      • A minimum of 3.70 GPA should be obtained.
      • All the above requirements should be completed within a period of four academic years.
    • Second Class (Upper Division)
      • “C” or better grades should be obtained for all the registered compulsory course units.
      • “B” or better grades should be obtained for a minimum of 60% out of the total credits of the compulsory course units of the main subject of BA Honours Degree.
      • A minimum of 3.30 GPA should be obtained.

3.2.3 All the above requirements should be completed within a period of four academic years.

  • Second Class (Lower Division)
    • “C” or better grades should be obtained for all the registered course units.
    • “B” or better grades should be obtained for a minimum of 60% out of the total credits of the compulsory course units
    • A minimum of 3.00 GPA should be obtained.

3.3.4 All the above requirements should be completed within a period of four academic years.

 

Requirements for the Honours Degree Programme

  1. In the first year, “D” or better grades should be obtained for the course units of a minimum of 30 credits. A minimum of 2.30 GPA should be obtained for the relevant course units counted for the 30 credits.
  2. “C” or better grades and a minimum of 3.00 GPA should be obtained for 10 credits of the compulsory course units of the subject chosen for the special degree.
  3. The number of students who would pursue the BA Honours Degree will be decided by the relevant Department. The priority will be given to those who have obtained a higher GPA.
  4. From the course units registered in Level 1, if a student receives an ‘E’ grade for a course unit, except for the subject applied for the BA Honours Degree, the student may be allowed to pursue the BA Honours Degree under the condition that she/he improves the grade (‘D’ or above) within the next year.
  5. Those students who did not sit the examinations for course units other than the course units of the subject offered for the Honours Degree due to medical reasons, can be selected for the Honours Degree with the recommendation of the Appeals Board. Such students must obtain a ‘D’ or a better grade for those course units within the next year.
  6. In case a student fails to sit the examination of course units which come under the subject she/he intends to pursue for the Honours Degree, based on the recommendation of the Appeals Board, she/he can still study for the Honours Degree with the condition that the particular course units are completed within the next year.

 

If the students who register for the Honours Degree under the condition mentioned in 4, 5, 6 requirements fail to fulfill the minimum requirements on the first given opportunity, those students’ registration for the Honours Degree will be cancelled. Such students should register programme for the Honours Degree under the condition mentioned in 4, 5, 6 requirements fail to fulfill the minimum of the main subject of BA Honours Degree for the Honours Degree will be cancelled. Such students should register for the BA Degree in the next academic year and complete that degree programme.

 

REFERENCES

Dharmasiri, Lal Mervin, New Strategies in the Curriculum Development in Geography: A Lesson from Sri Lanka. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282156247_ NEW_STRATEGIES_IN_THE_CURRICULUM_DEVELOPMENT_IN_GEOGRAPHY_A_LESSON_FROM_SRI_LANKA [accessed Apr 15 2020].

Hofstrand R (1996) Getting all the skills employers want. Techniques. Making Education & Career Connections 71: 51.

Len Holmes, Reconsidering Graduate Employability: the `graduate identity’ approach, Quality in Higher Education, Vol. 7, No. 2, 2001

Ministry of Higher Education, SRI LANKA QUALIFICATIONS FRAMEWORK. Available from: http://www.ugc.ac.lk/attachments/1156_Sri_Lanka_Qualifications_Framework.pdf [Accessed: 2020-04-07]

National Committee of Inquiry in to Higher Education (NCIHE), 1997, Higher Education in the Learning Society (London, HMSO)

Mike Fleetham (2018), ‘Training, Consultancy and Resources to Improve Teaching and Learning’ Available on the web;  ttps://www.thinkingclassroom.co.uk/ThinkingClassroom/ SkillsBasedLearning.aspx#keyideas [Accessed: 2020-05-12).

 

CONTACT US

Department of Geography

University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya 11600,

Sri Lanka

+094 (112) 903 920

geographykln@gmail.com

                                                        

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