B.A. (Hons) Geography

1.1        Introduction

 

The curriculum development of the Special Degree Programme has been identified as a long felt necessity in the Faculty of Social Sciences due to the demand for improving the “employability” of graduates who should take on highly productive national and international commitments and the national demand for producing graduates with high “quality”. In response to this need, the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Kelaniya, has set out a common framework for improving curriculum of the Special Degree Programme. The Faculty undertook this initiative in collaboration with the World Bank funded project of IRQUE-QEF Batch 3.

 

The Department of Geography in the Faculty of Social Sciences through a series of discussions at the Faculty level and Departmental level, has presented this report containing a new syllabi for the Special Degree Programme. This degree programme will be offered under two streams, (a) Social and Economic Geography and, (b) Environmental Geography. 

 

1.2        Department Vision

 

The Department of Geography envisages;  “to create and maintain a challenging and intellectually vital learning community that engages students and faculty in continuing discourse, with focus on active, informed, productive, and creative, open-minded, and ethically responsible professional training and citizenship in a complex, multicultural world in which change and spatial variation are natural phenomena”.

  

1.3        Department Mission

 

The Department of Geography expects; “to provide students with an overview of the discipline, specific skills that will help them in their future careers, and knowledge that will help them organize and maintain an effective philosophy of life that reflects an understanding of their natural and cultural surroundings”.

 

1.4        Needs assessment

 

Firstly, to start with the curriculum development process and to acquire a proper needs assessment, the Department organized a guest lecture, followed by a discussion, on “the Employability of Geography Graduates in Sri Lanka”. This was delivered by an experienced professor in Geography. The objective of university education, problems of Sri Lankan university- industry linkage, modern societal demands on university education and existing policy recommendations on university education were the major issues under the discussion. Several recommendations relating to the outcome of graduates were studied by the staff. The participants agreed for a substantial improvement of the existing syllabi of Geography. Some of the important recommendations of the discussion are given below.

 

  1. Introducing a core curriculum catering the social demands for university students.
  • English should be made the medium of instruction.
  • Need for promoting intellectual culture by encouraging the positive support of student organizations
  • Allowing the graduates to develop self-confidence and commanding personalities.
  • Directing students to industry/services on completion of the degree, as part of improving the overall quality of university education.
  • Allowing the students to complete among students and rewarding the winners while helping the others.

 

Secondly, the academic staff also scrutinized the “Subject Benchmark Statement in Geography” produced by the University Grants Commission in Sri Lanka. The Subject Benchmark Statements promotes the quality and standards of a curriculum by guiding what is expected of a graduate in a specific subject area in a form readily accessible to students, employers and others with a stake in higher education qualifications.

 

Thirdly, the assessment on higher education in Sri Lanka made by the World Bank was taken into consideration. It is critically important that Sri Lanka develops its intellectual capital to reach middle-income status and to do so universities need to meet many challenges and produce world-class graduates. The economic relevance and the quality of the higher education sector at present are considered to be below the level required of a middle-income country.

 

The World Bank report indicates that Sri Lanka spends a substantially smaller portion of its national income on education compared to other middle income countries. Public investment on university teaching and research, and the alternative higher education institutes is also low.

 

As such, Sri Lanka’s role of higher education now is to look at development at multiple levels, including the level of individual degree programs and courses within institutions.

 

 “Sri Lanka is on two waves of opportunity. Firstly, transforming the nation from a low income country to a middle -income country and secondly from a country in conflict to a country of peace. In this context the higher education sector can lead Sri Lanka successfully over these two waves of golden opportunity”,

 

Naoko Ishii, World Bank Country Director for Sri Lanka –

Sri Lanka Higher Education Sector Report ‘The Towers of Learning Performance, Peril and Promise’ , World Bank, Page 1.

  

1.5        Teaching and Learning Outcomes

 

The teaching and learning outcomes of each course unit were identified on basis of Bloom's Taxonomy. It is summarized in Annex 3.

 

1.6        Assessment methods

 

Student’s grade in each of course will be determined as follows: While the structure is quite similar to the existing assessment procedure, in order to encourage the students’ attendance in the class, 5% of the total marks will be allocated for attendance.

                                                                                                  

             

                                                                                                 1.1 Table – Class     

5%

Class Attendance:    details of the class attendance  method is in table 1.1

10%

Tutorial -1

 

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

 

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Percentage

Marks

80<

5%

80 – 70

4%

70 – 60

3%

60 – 50

2%

50 – 40

1%

40>

0

 

 

 1.8       Structure of the syllabi and credit allocation

 

 

            A total of 120 credits are allocated among 30 units in the Special Degree Programme. The

            complete syllabi presented in the Annex 01 have been summarized according to the credit

            allocation in Table 1.

 

Table 1:Summary of Credit Allocation

Level

Semester

Credits

Number of Units

Total Credits

Core

Aux.

2

1

18

2

10

40

2

20

 

3

1

17

 

09

36

2

17

2

4

1

19

-

08

36

2

17

-

Total

108

4

27

112

                          


 

Accordingly, at the level 1, students can follow 2 units in Geography if they wish to be considered for the Special Degree Programme from level 2 onwards. At the level 2 and 3, students should follow 17 core units offered by the Department of Geography and 3 auxiliary units offered by other Departments in the Faculty.  In the 2nd semester of level 3, students will be placed in internship/institutional training which is also a core unit. At level 4, the students can select either Social or Economic Geography stream (SEG) or Environmental Geography (EG)

Stream. Each stream consists of 8 core units including the dissertation. 

 

 

GEOGRAPHY

 Level 2  -  Semester I

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 21415

Title                                         : Principles of Cartography

 

Learning Outcome: The purpose of this course is to build upon and expand student’s cartographic comprehension and skills in cartographic principles and data visualization, and to prepare students for application and analysis of their understanding in real world cartographic productions.  The students will demonstrate their cartographic skills in both topographic and thematic cartography. They will particularly be able to interpret Sri Lanka topographic maps at various scales, apply cartographic techniques to represent physical and human geographic features and draw thematic maps.

 

Course Content:

  • History, definitions, scope and profession of Cartography
  • Objectives of cartography
  • Types of maps: Topographic maps and Thematic maps
  • Introduction to thematic mapping
  • Understanding the topographic map of Sri Lanka
  • Representation of socioeconomic data
  • Coordinate systems and map projections
  • Contours, profiles, and slope analyses
  • Representation of meteorological and climate data
  • Common features of map
  • Map elements with special reference to scales
  • Visualization and visual variables
  • Map design process

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

As this unit is designed to teach essential cartographic techniques, lectures as well as practical work equally constitute the course.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance (See above Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial 

25%

Compilation of Practical Work Book

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Campbell, J., 1991, Introduction to Cartography. 2nd ed. Dubuque, Ia.: Wm. C. Brown.

Campbell, J., 2001, Map Use & Analysis. 4th ed. McGraw Hill

Dent, Borden, 1999, Cartography, - Thematic Map Design, Fifth Edition, McGraw-Hill

International Cartographic Association, (ICA), 1984, Basic Cartography for Students and Technicians Vol.I.

Misra, Rameshwar Prasad, 1969, Fundamentals of Cartography, University of Mysore, Parasranga, India 

Monkhouse, F. J. and Wilkinson, H. R., 1971, Maps and Diagrams-3rd edition, Methuen and Co., LTD, London

Raisz, Erwin, 1962, Principles of Cartography, McGraw Hill Book Co., Inc., New York 

Robinson, Arthur H., Joel L. Morrison, Phillip C. Muehrcke, A. Jon Kimerling, Stephen C. Guptill, 1995, Elements of Cartography, Wiley

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 21424 

Title                                         : Statistical Techniques for Geography  

 

Learning Outcomes: The aim of this course unit is to equip the students with statistical skills enabling them to intelligently collect, analyze and interpret data mainly relevant to the subject of geography. It would also help them to demonstrate their ability in solving problems in a context with information and data and, to be engaged in decision making through inductive reasoning.

 

Course Content:

  • Scientific method, statistical thinking and nature of spatial data
  • Descriptive statistics
  • Probability and probability distributions
  • Sampling
  • Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals
  • Correlation and regression analysis
  • Analysis of variance
  • Spatial pattern analyses

 

Methods Teaching and Learning:

This course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the major issues of the course and, students will learn other information through in class practical lessons, student projects and writing assignments.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1 (Practical lesson)

10%

Tutorial -2 (Practical lesson)

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Hammond, R., and Patrick S. McCullagh, 1978, Quantitative Techniques in Geography: An Introduction, Clarendon Press, Oxford

Rogerson, Peter A., 2006, Statistical Methods for Geography: A Student's Guide, SAGE Publications Ltd, London 

Wheeler, Dennis, Gareth Shaw & Stewart Barr, 1994, Statistical Techniques in Geographical Analysis, David Fulton Publishers Ltd, London,

Yeates, Maurice, 1974, An Introduction to Quantitative Analysis in Human Geography, McGraw Hill Inc., New York

Marczyk, Geoffrey R., David DeMatteo &, David Festinger, 2005, Essentials of Research Design and Methodology, John Wiley & Sons Inc., USA

Moser, C.A. and Kalton, G, 1975, Survey Methods in Social Investigation, Heinemann Educational Books, London

Van Maanen, John, 1979, Quantitative Methodology, SAGE Publications, New Delhi

Franklin, Billy, J and Osborne Harold, W, 1971, Research Methods, Wadsworth Publishing Company

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 21435

Title                                         : Geomorphology

 

Learning Outcome: The main objective of this course is to interpret the earth's different landforms within a human-environmental framework. By the end of this course, the students should be able to illustrate the dynamic nature of geomorphologic characteristics, its natural causes and the impact on man and his activities. Also, they will explain the consequences created by man on the geomorphologic processes and examine the ways of controlling these impacts. 

 

Course Content:

  • Concepts and definitions of geomorphology
  • Theories on the origin, evolution of universe and earth and, earth’s interior
  • Geological history of earth
  • Earth’s crust, composition of earth
  • Concepts of geomorphic cycles and landscape development
  • Quaternary and ancient landform history
  • Factors controlling landform development, earthquakes and tsunamis;
  • Endogenetic and  exogenetic forces
  • Continental drift, plate tectonics and evolution of different orders of landforms
  • Minerals, rocks, soils and soil classifications
  • Weathering and mass movement processes
  • Volcanic and structural landforms
  • Karst landforms, glacial landforms, desert landforms and coastal landforms
  • Erosion cycles, landforms created by erosion, fluvial landforms and slope development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:                     

The course consists of lectures, map exercises and a field study. The students will identify landforms in Sri Lanka using topographic maps, aerial photographs, and through field observations. They will also use geomorphologic techniques in the analyses.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment Based on the Field Study

60%

Semester End Examination

Recommended Reading:

Bloom A. L., 2003: Geomorphology: A Systematic Analysis of Late Cenozoic Landforms, Prentice-Hall

of India, New Delhi.

Christopherson, Robert W., (2011), Geosystems: An Introduction to Physical Geography, 8 Ed.,

Macmillan Publishing Company

Huggett, Richard J.,2007, Fundamentals of Geomorphology, Second Edition. Routledge: New York

Kale V. S. and Gupta A., 2001: Introduction to Geomorphology, Orient Longman, Hyderabad

Selby, M.J., (2005), Earth’s Changing Surface, Indian Edition, OUP

Strahler, Alan, H & Arthur Strahler, 2006, Introducing Physical Geography, John Wiley & Sons Inc., USA

Strahler A. H., 2008: Modern Physical Geography (4th Edition), Wiley-India.

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 21444 / SOST 21494

Title                                         : Population Studies

 

Learning Outcome: This course is intended to fulfill the requirement of equipping the students with analytical knowledge and skills on the population from a spatial perspective. They will distinguish and learn the local, national, regional and global patterns of four demographic processes: fertility, mortality, migration and distribution. They will also explain the determinants affecting these demographic patterns.

 

Course Content:

  • Concepts and theories of demographic processes
  • Spatial and temporal patterns of world population
  • Structure and composition of population
  • Population problems in spatial context
  • Population policies and programmes
  • Population and development
  • Population and environment

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

To meet its objectives, this course utilizes a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the principles of population studies and, student projects and presentations, discussions and assignments will comprise the rest of the requirements.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:                                                                

Bailey, Adrian, 2005, Making Population Geography (Human Geography in the Making)

Bhende A. and Kanitkar T., 2000: Principles of Population Studies, Himalaya Publishing House

Jones, Huw, 1990, Population Geography

Ness, Gale. D., Drake William D., and Brcchin Stream, R, Population and Environment Dynamics, Michigan University Press, Ann Arbor, 1993

Newbold K. B., 2009: Population Geography: Tools and Issues, Rowman and Littlefield Publishers

Peters, Gary L. and  

Robert P. Larkin, 2008, Population Geography: Problems, Concepts, and Prospe

 

Level 2 -  Semester 2

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 22414/ DVST 22414

Title                                         : Geographical Information Systems

 

Learning Outcome: The main aim of this course is to This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of GIS including map projections, and nature of geospatial data; application of various analyses of geospatial data; computer architecture and file systems; making maps and presenting findings; developing a perseverance in solution of complex computer algorithms. On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to describe the fundamental components of a GIS; define system specifications including projections, data and process modeling; organize, using appropriate data structures, geographic data within a GIS; analyze data and prepare digital databases using GIS software; and summarize, using maps and tables, the results of GIS based analyses.   

 

Course Content:

Topics to be covered include:

  • Introduction to GIS: definitions, components of GIS, factors supporting the rise of GIS, philosophy of GIS, advantages of GIS,
  • Maps and GIS: definitions, map essentials, types of maps, map data, spatial data, spatial data coordinate systems, map projections, Universal Transverse Mercator Projection (UTM)
  • Digital representation of geographic data, data base and data base management
  • Models in GIS: Raster and Vector data base, data quality and data standards, data capturing and processing, Raster and Vector base data capturing systems, processing and analyzing techniques
  • Structures in GIS: Vector data structure, Raster data structure, comparison between Vector and Raster data structures, advantages and disadvantages
  • Visualization of GIS data: cartography in the context of GIS, digital terracing modeling, spatial analysis
  • GIS application: computerized mapping, and spatial analysis, major areas of application
  • Fundamentals of remote sensing: definitions, satellite remote sensing process, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, passive and active sensing, characteristics of images
  • Satellite and sensors: satellite characteristics-orbits and swaths, characterization of satellite remote sensing systems
  • Image interpretation and analysis: visual interpretation, digital image processing

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course work consists of lectures, power point presentations, reading suggested materials, handouts, class discussions and lab work.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial  (Practical )

25%

Lab Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht, Jochen, 2007, Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Bernhardsen, Tor, 1999, Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

Burrough P. A. and McDonnell R. A., 2000: Principles of Geographical Information Systems–Spatial Information Systems and Geostatistics, Oxford University Press.

Campbell J. B., 2007: Introduction to Remote Sensing, Guildford Press.

Chang K.-T., 2009: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems, McGraw-Hill. Chrisman,

Nicholas, R, 1996, Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

Clarke K. C., 2001: Getting Started with Geographic Information Systems, Prentice Hall.

David, Bruce, 1996, GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

DeMers M. N., 2000: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley & Sons

Jensen J. R., 2004: Introductory Digital Image Processing: A Remote Sensing Perspective, Prentice Hall.

Michael N. Demers, 2000, Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems, Second Edition

Ratnayake,R.,2008,Fundamentals of Remote Sensing: Interpretation and Application, Deel Holdings, Kelaniya

 

Heywood I., Cornelius S. and Carver S., 2006: An Introduction to Geographical Information Systems, Prentice Hall.

 

Schuurman N., 2004: GIS – A Short Introduction, Blackwell

 

Shrestha, Basanta, Birendra Bajracharya and Sushil Pradhan, GIS for Beginners, 2001, Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Nepal

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 22425

Title                                         : Climatology 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit is designed to provide the comprehension on climatic characteristics of different regions in the world and its influence on man and his activities. Upon completion of the course, the students will be able to illustrate and apply this knowledge particularly on examining ways of minimizing the man’s impact on climate change. The course also aims to discuss analytical skills to explain the impact of human activities on the earth-atmospheric system.

 

Course Content:

The topics of interest include:

  • Field and scope of climatology
  • Stratification and composition of atmosphere
  • Isolation and thermodynamics
  • Radiation and energy in the atmosphere
  • Temperature control in the atmosphere
  • Atmospheric pressure and wind system
  • Atmospheric moisture, water vapor, humidity and precipitation
  • General circulation of atmosphere
  • Air masses, fronts and cyclones
  • Tropical atmosphere
  • Climatic characteristics of the mid latitudes
  • Climatic classifications: Koppen, Thornthwaite
  • Microclimates
  • Paleo-climatology
  • Climate and vegetation
  • Natural climate variability
  • Man and climatic changes

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This course utilizes a range of teaching and learning methods which constitutes lectures providing much of the theories and principles. In addition, student projects and presentations, discussions and writing assignments will also play a major role.

 

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Bridgman, Howard A. and John E. Oliver, 2006, The Global Climate System: Patterns, Processes, and Teleconnections

Edward Aguado and James E. Burt, 2007. Understanding Weather and Climate, 4th edition, Pearson/Prentice Hall.

Lutgens F. K., Tarbuck E. J. and Tasa D., 2009: The Atmosphere: An Introduction to Meteorology, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Oliver J. E. and Hidore J. J., 2002: Climatology: An Atmospheric Science, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

Rohli, Robert V. and Anthony J. Vega, 2007, Climatology

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 22434

Title                                         : Economic Geography 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course offers a broad overview of how production and consumption are distributed on the earth’s surface. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of the major themes in economic Geography and how they can serve for evaluating spatial patterns of economic activities.  In addition, the course will focus on the relationship between the natural processes that have shaped the Earth’s surface and the development of economic activities around the globe.

Course Content:

  • Organization of world’s resources and economic opportunities.
  • History of global economy and capitalism.
  • Different commodities, sectors and labor systems such as slavery and peasant agriculture 
  • Global business practices (multinational strategies, location decisions, technologies, competition) affecting economies, environments and human life.
  • Challenges of “old world order” with free trade, fair trade, recycling, green businesses, community-supported agriculture and alternative energy
  • Consumerism supporting or destabilizing economies and environments.
  • Global labour markets and the character of jobs.
  • Global economy
  • Population and consumption
  • Raw materials and energy
  • Sustainable business and development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the principles of the field and other fundamental information, while student projects and presentations, discussions, writing assignments will also play a major role.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Bagchi-Sen S. and Smith H. L., 2006: Economic Geography: Past, Present and Future, Taylor and Francis

Coe N. M., Kelly P. F. and Yeung H. W., 2007: Economic Geography: A Contemporary Introduction,

Wiley-Blackwell

Combes P., Mayer T. and Thisse J. F., 2008: Economic Geography: The Integration of Regions and Nations, Princeton University Press.

Goh Cheng Leong and G.C. Morgan, 1973, Human and Economic Geography, Oxford University Press

Hartshorne, A, A. Truman and W. John, 2005, Economic Geography, 3rd Edition, Prentic Hall, India

Knox, Paul, John Agnew and Linda McCarthy, 2003. The Geography of the World Economy. 4th Edition. London: Edward Arnold.

Willington D. E., 2008: Economic Geography, Husband Press.

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 22442 / DVST 22442

Title                                         : Survival Skills for Career Planning 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit is designed to demonstrate the value of developing personal attributes and to examine the transferable skills to be acquired by the students during their university life. With the comprehension of these attributes and skills, it is expected that the students should be able to discover successful employment opportunities and a productive social life.

 

Course Content:

The course constitutes following components 

  • Assessing personal goals, abilities, needs, values and interests
  • Models on career planning
  • Job search and Holland's theory of career choice
  • Applying for jobs using a resume (CV) and cover letter
  • Facing the interviews for available positions
  • Considering the job offers, its options and opportunities
  • Plan and implement a program for Career development
  • Resources of career development: local and global
  • Improving awareness on problems
  • Career counseling and mentoring
  • Taking appropriate action and decision-making
  • Assessing the performance
  • Understanding career pathways and career connections

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This course will integrate elements of Problem-based Learning (PBL) with traditional classroom activities. PBL is a way to engage interest in the material, to promote deeper learning, to help the students remember what they are learning, and to promote lifelong capacities in problem-solving and critical thinking.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial

25%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Ashley, Roderic, 1998, Enhancing Your Employability

Smale, Bob and Julie Fowlie, 2008, How to Succeed at University: An Essential Guide to Academic Skills and Personal Development (Sage Study Skills Series)

Sukiennik, Diane, William Bendat, Lisa Raufman, 2007, The Career Fitness Program: Exercising Your Options, Eighth Edition, Pearson-Prentice Hall

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 22454

Title                                         : Political Geography  

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will examine the interconnectedness of geography and politics in the field of political geography. They will learn the geographical impacts of political decisions at variety of geographical scales. Also, they will analyze geographical factors and places which have impact on political decisions and changes. In this course, the students will focus on the terrorism to analyze challenges to, and responses of the sovereign, territorial nation-state and discuss the role of states, individuals, localities, trans-state organizations, and social movements in the changing world of political geography.

 

Course Content:

  • Scope, definitions and development of political geography
  • Division of space, sovereignty and territoriality, frontiers, boundaries and regions, geo politics and power analysis
  • Idea of state, nation states and nationalism, citizenship and representation 
  • Electoral geographies
  • Colonialism, socialism and neoliberalism
  • Divisions of global power, globalization and world systems, global geopolitics 
  • Transnational political movements
  • Spatial analysis of civil war, violence, terrorism and anti-statist
  • Politics and development
  • Sustainable development, governance and administrative system

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Fahrer, Chuck and Martin Ira Glassner, 2003,Political Geography

Blacksell, Mark, 2006, Political Geography, Routledge,  

Cox, Kevin R., Murray Low, and Jennifer Robinson, 2007, The SAGE Handbook of Political Geography

Gallaher, Carolyn, Carl T Dahlman, Mary Gilmartin, and Alison Mountz, 2009, Key Concepts in Political Geography, SAGE Publications, 

 

Level 3  -  Semester 1

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 31414

Title                                         : Transformation of Agriculture  

 

Learning Outcomes:

This course provides the students with an overview of the major developments in agriculture and their relationships to the changes in rural society.  The focus is to provide a framework for understanding the mechanism of agricultural change and its impacts on rural communities. The students will also examine the consequences, both positive and negative of these changes and expected changes in the future.  

 

Course Content:

  • Agricultural evolution: Plant and animal domestication (cultigens)
  • Change of agriculture from subsistence to modern
  • Change of agriculture from commodity to civic
  • Agriculture after World War II
  • World agricultural systems and classifications
  • Farming in the 21st century
  • Dimensions of green revolution and aftermath
  • Changes in government agricultural policies
  • Changes in land tenure
  • Agrarian reform programs
  • History of agriculture in Sri Lanka
  • Sustainable agriculture

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies/ projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues. Case study/ project is based on field survey.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Conkin, Paul K., 2008, A Revolution Down on the Farm: The Transformation of American Agriculture Since 1929, University Press of Kentucky 

Grigg, David, 1984, An Introduction to Agricultural Geography, Huthinson University press, New York

Grigg, D.B., 1990, Population Growth and Agrarian Change: A Historical Perspective, Cambridge

Peiris, G.H.,1996, Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, Macmillan India Ltd, New Delhi

Peiris, G.H., 2006, Sri lanka: Challenges of the New Millennium, Kandy Books, Kandy

Reddy, Ravinder M., 2004, Technological Transformation in Indian Agriculture

Van Zanden, J. L. and J. L. Van Zanden, 1993, The Transformation of European Agriculture in the Nineteenth Century: The Case of the Netherlands

Stanis, V. F, 1976, The Socialist Transformation of Agriculture: Theory and Practice  

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 31425 / DVST 31425

Title                                         : Geography of Sri Lanka  

 

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected at gaining a comprehensive knowledge on key geographical issues and, ability to associate its relationship with the development process in Sri Lanka.  They will also analyze the changing patterns of geographical issues in a broader temporal and spatial scale and further explain their causes and consequences.

 

Course Content:

The topics include:

  • Physical environment
  • Influence of location and geography on Sri Lanka’s development
  • Socio economic landscape shaped by colonization
  • Spatial patterns of socio economic characteristics
  • Land use patterns, irrigation and agriculture
  • Settlement patterns and urbanization
  • ‘Post-independence’ development and ‘post-war on terror’ challenges
  • Natural hazards and disaster management
  • Development in Sri Lanka in the context of regional and global dynamics
  • Development projects in backward areas

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

To meet its objectives, this course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the major issues of the course and, students will learn other information through a field study and presentations, discussions, writing assignments and internet search.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment Based on a Field Study

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Brun, Catherine & Tariq Jazeel, 2009, Spatialising politics: Culture and Geography in Postcolonial Sri Lanka, SAGE Publications India Pvt. Ltd,

Domroes, M., and H. Roth, eds. 1998, Sri Lanka—Past and Present: Archaeology, Geography, Economics. Weikersheim, Germany: Margraf.

Grover, Paul, A, 1996, Economic Development and Social Change in Sri Lanka:Spatial and Policy Analysis, Manohan Publishers, New Delhi

Johnson, B. L. C., and M. Le Scrivenor. 1981, Sri Lanka: Land, People, and Economy. London: Heinemann.

Lakshman, W.D, 1997, Dilemmas of Development: Fifty Years of Economic Change in Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka Association of Economists, Colombo

Peiris, G. H. 1996, Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives. New Delhi: Macmillan.

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 31434

Title                                         : Spatial Patterns of Development 

 

Learning Outcomes: This aim of this course unit is to direct the students to critically analyze the development process taking place in the world. They will apply the geographical perspective, approaches and models and explain the patterns of development under various circumstances. The students should also examine different measurements in assessing the development. 

 

Course Content:

·         Concept of development

·         Applicability of development at various scales

  • Indicators of development, validity and their limitations
  • Patterns of development

·         Global scale patterns in development,

·         Country scale patterns in development

·         Core - periphery theory and other models

·         Changes over time: The Brandt Line.

  • Development issues in the "poorer" and "richer" countries
  • Spatial patterns of development
  • Appropriate development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the major issues of the course and, students will learn other information through student projects and presentations, discussions, writing assignments and internet search.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Cole, John P., 1987, Development and Underdevelopment: A Profile of The Third World, Routledge,

Kambahmpati, Uma, 2004, Development and the Developing World, Blackwell Publishing Inc,USA

Potter, Robert B. ,Tony Binns, David W. Smith, and Jennifer A. Elliott, 1999, Geographies of Development: An Introduction to Development Studies, Pearson Education Limited, England 

Szirmai, Adam, 2005, An Introduction to the Dynamics of Socio-Economic Development, Press Syndicate of the University of Cambridge 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 31444

Title                                         : Research Methodology in Geography

 

Learning Outcomes: By undertaking this course unit, the students will be able to explain the way in which research is conducted which may be envisioned of in terms of the research philosophy, discover the research strategy to be employed and, apply the best research instruments to be utilized in the pursuit of goals in their own research projects and the quest for the solution of a research problem.

Course Content:

  • Philosophy and the purpose of scientific approach
  • Research: applications, definitions, characteristics and types
  • Ethical considerations and stakeholders
  • Problem formulation: rationale and objectives
  • Literature review and plagiarism
  • Identification of variables and measurements
  • Constructing hypotheses: functions, characteristics and types
  • Research design: functions and selection
  • Sampling: principles and types
  • Instruments for data collection by primary and secondary sources
  • Bias, validity, reliability and accuracy of data and instruments
  • Data processing: editing, coding, frame of analysis, role of statistics
  • Data display: tables, graphs and diagrams
  • Proposal writing
  • Report writing and referencing and making verbal presentations

 

 

Teaching and Learning Outcome:

Instruction for this course may be achieved through the use of the following: lectures, discussion of textual material on principles of research, practical lessons and assignments.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

25%

Synopsis

10%

Synopsis based presentation

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Dharmasiri, L.M., 2009, Samajeeya Vidya Paryeshana, 3rd Edition, Author Publication, (in Sinhala)

Gomm, Roger, 2004, Social Research Methodology: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, Palgrave Macmillan, New York

Kumar, Ranjith, 1996, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

 

Level 3 -  Semester 2

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 32414

Title                                         : Geography of Contemporary Global Issues  

 

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, it is expected that the students will become thoroughly familiar with the major global issues, will demonstrate effectively the ability to inquire, synthesize, evaluate, and form well-informed opinions about contemporary global issues and to acknowledge and critically evaluate various viewpoints concerning the global issues.

 

Course Content:

The students will be introduced to various global issues that integrate time and regions. Since the course is strongly influenced by current world events, the lecturer may introduce additional relevant topics.

  • Introduction
  • Quality of life: health
  • Human rights
  • War and nuclear weapons
  • Separatist movements, security and terrorism
  • Essential human needs: food (food security, malnutrition)
  • Water
  • Energy
  • Environmental changes: and global warming, sea level rise
  • Environmental changes: Pollution

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

Instruction for this course may be achieved through the use of the following: lectures, discussion of textual material on current world events and video presentations.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment (Group project)

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Green, Mary, 2006, Geography: Global Issues, Folens Ltd, Ireland

Pickering, Kevin, T & Owen, Lewis A., 1994, An Introduction to Global Environmental Issues, 2nd Edition, Routledge, USA 

SeitZ, John, 2002, Global Issues: Introduction, 3rd Edition,Blackwell Publishing Ltd 

Wheeler, Benjamin, Gilda Wheeler & Wendy Church, 2005, It's All Connected: A Comprehensive Guide to Global Issues and Sustainable Solutions, Published by Facing the Future, USA  

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 32424/ DVST 32424

Title                                         : Regional Studies:  India and China 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the students knowledge with the uniqueness and diversity of both physical and human geography in India and China. Upon completion of the course, the students should be able to distinguish and discuss the interaction between the physical environment, human settlement, development, and problems of the nations in India and China. They should also discover and examine the success of regional development strategies in both countries in their own context.

 

Course Content:

Following sections will enrich the understanding of India and China.

  • Region and regional geography
  • India and China as unique and diverse regions
  • Physical Setting
  • History, politics, social structure, and traditions of India and China
  • Utilization of natural resources 
  • Agriculture, Industrialization and development
  • Migration
  • Globalization and development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and internet search.

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Kynge, James, 2006, China Shakes the World:  A Titan’s Troubled Future and the Challenge for America, Haughton Mifflin Company, New York

Meredith, Robyn, 2007, The Elephant and the Dragon: the Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us,  W.W. Norton & Company Inc., New York

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 32434 / DVST 32434

Course Title                             : Internship / Institutional Training

 

Learning Outcomes: This training is designed to give the students opportunity of learning to work in a selected institution that is consistent with the field of Geography, under the supervision of an employer and a coordinating lecturer. The aim of this training which is to be acquired outside of the university environment is to get “total work experience” with the world of work. Students who successfully complete this training will demonstrate their familiarity with intellectual skills, transferable skills and excellent personal attributes.   

 

Course Content:

The internship would essentially include the “total work experience” on the following: 

  • Problem solving and decision making
  • Planning, service learning and customer care
  • Keeping records and use of resources
  • IT skills and communication skills
  • Community service, social skills, nurturing relationships and volunteering
  • Leadership, responsible citizenship and truthfulness
  • Contributions to group efforts and teamwork
  • Time-management
  • Self-motivation, attendance and punctuality
  • Coping with uncertainty, flexibility and conflict resolution
  • Concern for others, empathy and sharing 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The student, Coordinator, and Employer will file monthly progress/evaluation reports, attend arranged meetings on the “total work experience”.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this unit will be determined as follows: The student must work a minimum of 240 hours for the 15 week-semester to receive the four credit hours.

 

30%

Attendance - average of 16 hours per week

30%

Employer rating on the “total work experience” 

40%

Project Assignment

 

Recommended Reading:

No textbook is required for this unit. On-site training materials and guidelines may be provided by the employer.  The student should comply with all work regulations of the employer. The employer and the student will sign an agreement on duties, working hours, workdays, payments, if any, time off, etc. 

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 32445

Title                                         : Land Utilization and Land Evaluation   

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will become aware of the importance of maintaining balance of the land as the carrier of both economic activities and the natural ecosystem. They will particularly learn and get acquainted with principles of soil conservation and land utilization. The students learn how to predict the suitability of land for specific uses based on land characteristics, using relevant methodologies.  It is expected that the students will base these predictions mainly on the awareness of soil properties and conservation.

 

Course Content:

  • Soil conservation: definition, scope and components of soil conservation, prerequisites for soil conservation. 
  • Processes and mechanism of soil erosion, types of erosion
  • Factors affecting soil erosion
  • Erosion hazard assessment
  • Soil conservation Measures 
  • Rain water management
  • Soil classification
  • Land capability classification, land suitability classification
  • Land use planning.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Blanco, Humberto and Rattan Lal, 2008, Principles of Soil Conservation and Management, Springer Publication

King, K. F. S, 1979, Land utilization in developing economies  

Mandal, R.B., 1990, Land Utilization; Theory and Practice

Morgan, R. P. C., 2005, Soil Erosion and Conservation, Blackwell Science Ltd., USA

 

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Auxiliary

Pre requisite                            : A minimum of a pass in SSCG 21452                           

Course Code                            : SSCG 32412

Title                                         : Basics of Geographical Information Systems

 

Learning Outcome: This course focuses on the basic concepts of GIS. On successful completion of this unit, the students will be able to identify the fundamental components of a GIS.    

 

Course Content:

Topics to be covered include:

  • Introduction to GIS: definitions, components of GIS and advantages of GIS
  • Maps and GIS
  • Introduction to map projections
  • Models in GIS
  • Structures in GIS
  • Cartography and GIS
  • Fundamentals of remote sensing

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course work consists of lectures, power point presentations, handouts, class discussions and lab work.

 

Assessment Procedure: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial 

25%

Practical based assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht, Jochen, 2007, Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Bernhardsen, Tor, 1999, Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

Ratnayake,R.,2008,Fundamentals of Remote Sensing: Interpritation and Application, Deel Holdings, Kelaniya

Chrisman, Nicholas, R, 1996, Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

David, Bruce, 1996, GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

Michael N.. Demers, 2000, Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems,  Second Edition

 

 

Level 4  -  Semester 1

 

Social and Economic Geography Stream

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41414

Title                                         : Regional Development and Planning  

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students are expected to explore the dynamics and complexity of development issues at regional level. The students will also explore the major development issues pertaining to different regions. The students will be exposed to and conduct profiles of regions in Sri Lanka and discuss alternative governance systems, and a framework for a new politics in regions.

 

Course Content:

  • Concept and definitions of region, regionalization, classification and hierarchy of regions, techniques of region delimitation, concept of rural- urban continuum, growth centers and growth poles
  • Regional disparities, methods and techniques of regional analysis and development: export base model. neo-classical model. input –output analysis, central place theory, growth pole theory and myrdal’s theory
  • Definition, scope and content of regional planning, historical overview of planning, fundamental planning concepts and planning methods
  • Application of planning principles to problem-solving in regional contexts
  • Directions in regional planning: town and country planning, river valley planning, resource planning, multi –level planning, economic development planning, land use planning and zoning, transportation planning and environmental planning
  • Regional development strategies, need and methods of micro-level planning, relevance of micro-level planning in community development, legal basis for planning, environmental issues in regional planning, planning for sustainable development.
  • Regional planning in Sri Lanka after independence

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures and discussions; writing tutorials; data collection & analysis using the secondary sources. A major component of the course will be participation in a field work to address a specific regional planning problem.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Glasson, John, 1978, An Introduction to Regional Planning: Concepts, Theory and Practice, 2nd edition, Hutchinson, London

Hall, Peter, 1982, Urban and Regional Planning, 2nd edition, George, Allen and Unwin, London

Laimmeier, H.D. and Peter, J. Swan, 1984, Equity with Growth, Planning Perspective for Small Towns in Developing Countries, Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok

Rengasamy, Srinivasan, 2009, Introduction to Regional Planning & Development, www.wepapers.com/ 

Sing, Ajith Kumara, 1981, Patterns of Regional Development: A Comparative Study, Sterling Publishers, New Delhi

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41423 / DVST 41423

Title                                         : Independent GIS Project  

 

Learning Outcomes: The students will be exposed to an independent GIS project which applies theory, methods and techniques learnt in the Unit of Geographical Information Systems. The unit mainly focuses on how to make GIS applications in different contexts. On successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the applications of GIS in specific spatial contexts, and to assemble, manipulate and analyze data relevant to a particular research issue.

 

Course Content:

The topics available are flexible and the students are allowed to select and design their own project under the supervision. To support the selection and work on a particular topic, following aspects will be covered in the unit.

  • Design of a GIS project
  • Geo spatial data applicable to GIS projects
  • Application of spatial and non-spatial data
  • Planning and implementation of a GIS project
  • Processing of field data and remote sensing data
  • Preparation of a GIS report

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures, seminars, fieldwork and presentations.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See above 1.7.2 Table)

35%

GIS Report

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht, Jochen, 2007, Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Bernhardsen, Tor, 1999, Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

Chrisman, Nicholas, R, 1996, Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

David, Bruce, 1996, GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

Michael N.. Demers, 2000, Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems,  Second Edition

Shrestha, Basanta, Birendra Bajracharya and Sushil Pradhan, GIS for Beginners, 2001, Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Nepal

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 41434

Title                                         : Urban Geography  

 

Learning Outcomes: This aim of this course is to examine the spatial evolution of the urban systems from the late 1700s through the present and changing spatial organization of economic activities, and how developments in economic structure, transportation, and communications have affected urban areas.  The course will also examine specific spatial processes that shape urban systems and urban futures.  By the end of this course, students should have a good understanding of the geography of a variety of urban systems, the processes that shape these systems, and how the geography of these systems in turn shapes society.

 

Course Content:

  • Field, origin, evolution and trends of urban geography
  • Morphological and functional characteristics of settlements
  • Origins and development of cities
  • Evolution of urban systems and urbanization process
  • Cities in the developed world
  • Cities in the developing world
  • Globalization of the urban system
  • Urban land use: Central Business District (CBD) and the growth of the suburbs
  • Economies of cities
  • Migration and urbanism
  • Urban housing and Sri Lanka’s  housing development programme
  • Urban poverty and segregation
  • Urban planning, policies and urban development
  • Institutional and organizational aspects of urban development
  •  

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures and discussions, writing tutorials and assignment, data collection & analysis using the secondary sources. A major component of the course will be participation in a field work to address a specific urban problem in a selected township.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Fyfe N. R. and Kenny J. T., 2005: The Urban Geography Reader, Routledge.

Graham S. and Marvin S., 2001: Splintering Urbanism: Networked Infrastructures,

Technological Mobilities and the Urban Condition, Routledge.

Hall T., 2006: Urban Geography, Taylor and Francis.

Kaplan D. H., Wheeler J. O. and Holloway S. R., 2008: Urban Geography, John Wiley.

Kaplan David, James O. Wheeler & Steven Holloway, 2009, Urban Geography, John Wiley & Sons Inc., USA  

Knox P. L. and McCarthy L., 2005: Urbanization: An Introduction to Urban Geography, Pearson Prentice Hall New York.

Knox P. L. and Pinch S., 2006: Urban Social Geography: An Introduction, Prentice- Hall.

Pacione M., 2009: Urban Geography: A Global Perspective, Taylor and Francis

Lowry, J.H., 1977, World City Growth, Edward Arnold, London

Madal, R.B.and G.L. Peters, 1982, Urbanization and Regional Development, Concept Publishers, New Delhi

Potter, Rob, 1992, Urbanization in the Third World, Oxford University press, UK

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41444 / DVST 41444

Title                                         : Rural Development in the Developing World

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course which presents the concept of rural development more as a process, the students are expected to critically examine the key concepts associated with rural development policies and, and to use these concepts in analyzing the reality, revealing the intricacies of rural development. The students will also study the challenges facing popular ideals associated with rural development.

 

Course Content:

  • Concepts associated with rural development in the developing countries
  • Growth and development
  • Industrialization and economic growth
  • Growth, distribution, equity and poverty
  • Theories and models of rural development
  • State and the development
  • Development strategies
  • Agricultural change and rural development
  • Trade, transnational corporations and development
  • Labour market patterns, women’s participation and rural development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures and discussions, writing tutorials and assignment, data collection & analysis using the secondary sources.

 

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See above 1.7.2 Table)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Chambers, R., 1983, Rural Development: Putting the Last First, Pearson Education Ltd, England

Dixon,  Chris, 1990, Rural Development in the Third World, Routledge

James Valentine Udoh, 1991, Urban and Rural Development in Third World Countries: Problems of Population in Developing Nations

Kambhampati, Uma S., 2004, Development and the Developing World: An Introduction, Blackwell Publishing Inc, USA 

McAreavey, Ruth, 2009, Rural Development Theory and Practice, Routledge 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41454

Title                                         : Geography of Tourism

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will be able to learn the tourism as a potential industry for the development. They will also examine local and international tourism, factors affecting, advantages and constraints as well as consequences of tourism. They will particularly consider the opportunities available in tourism for rural communities.

 

Course Content:

  • Geography of tourism, concepts and definitions of tourism, Importance, benefits, disadvantages and elements of tourism, types of tourism
  • Evolution of tourism, transportation development and tourism
  • Tourism in the developing world, tourism and poverty alleviation
  • Concept and history of eco tourism, impact of eco tourism
  • Sustainable tourism, pro poor tourism
  • Factors associated with tourism
  • Demand, promotion and marketing of tourism
  • Opportunities and challenges in tourism
  • Origins and destination areas of tourism
  • Implications of climate change on tourism
  • Climate change mitigation and measures on tourism
  • Globalization and tourism, international tourism: trends and regional growth
  • International tourist flows: origins and destinations
  • Selected tourist locations in the world
  • Trends and Characteristics of Sri Lanka tourism
  • Movements and accommodation industry, revenue and employment in Sri Lanka tourism

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Boniface B. G. and Chris C., 2005: Worldwide Destinations: The Geography of Travel

and Tourism, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford.

Boo, E., 1990, Ecotourism: The Potentials and Pitfalls, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC

Dhar P. N., 2006: International Tourism: Emerging Challenges and Future Prospects,

Kanishka, New Delhi.

Hall M. and Stephan P., 2006: Geography of Tourism and Recreation – Environment,

Place and Space, Routledge, London.

Lloyd E. Hudman and Richard H Jac kson, 2002, Geography of Travel & Tourism

McIntosh, R.W., 1977, Tourism: Principles, Practices and Philosophies, 2nd edition, Grid Inc., Ohio

Mendis, E.D.L., 1981, The Economic, Social and Cultural Impact of Tourism on Sri Lanka

Pearce, D.G, 1995, Tourism Today: A Geographical Analysis, 2nd Edition, Longman Group, New York

Robinson, H, 1976, A Geography of Tourism, Macdonald and Evans, London

Williams, Stephen 2007,Tourism Geography, Routledge

 

 

 

Environmental Geography Stream

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41423 / DVST 41423

Title                                         : Independent GIS Project  

 

Learning Outcomes: The students will be exposed to an independent GIS project which applies theory, methods and techniques learnt in the Unit of Geographical Information Systems. The unit mainly focuses on how to make GIS applications in different contexts. On successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the applications of GIS in specific spatial contexts, and to assemble, manipulate and analyze data relevant to a particular research issue.

 

Course Content:

The topics available are flexible and the students are allowed to select and design their own project under the supervision. To support the selection and work on a particular topic, following aspects will be covered in the unit.

  • Design of a GIS project
  • Geo spatial data applicable to GIS projects
  • Application of spatial and non-spatial data
  • Planning and implementation of a GIS project
  • Processing of field data and remote sensing data
  • Preparation of a GIS report

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures, seminars, fieldwork and presentations.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

35%

GIS Report

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht, Jochen, 2007, Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Bernhardsen, Tor, 1999, Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

Chrisman, Nicholas, R, 1996, Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York

David, Bruce, 1996, GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

Michael N.. Demers, 2000, Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems,  Second Edition

Shrestha, Basanta, Birendra Bajracharya and Sushil Pradhan, GIS for Beginners, 2001, Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Nepal

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41454

Title                                         : Geography of Tourism

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will be able to learn the tourism as a potential industry for the development. They will also examine local and international tourism, factors affecting, advantages and constraints as well as consequences of tourism. They will particularly consider the opportunities available in tourism for rural communities.

 

Course Content:

  • Geography of tourism, concepts and definitions of tourism, Importance, benefits, disadvantages and elements of tourism, types of tourism
  • Evolution of tourism, transportation development and tourism
  • Tourism in the developing world, tourism and poverty alleviation
  • Concept and history of eco tourism, impact of eco tourism
  • Sustainable tourism, pro poor tourism
  • Factors associated with tourism
  • Demand, promotion and marketing of tourism
  • Opportunities and challenges in tourism
  • Origins and destination areas of tourism
  • Implications of climate change on tourism
  • Climate change mitigation and measures on tourism
  • Globalization and tourism, international tourism: trends and regional growth
  • International tourist flows: origins and destinations
  • Selected tourist locations in the world
  • Trends and Characteristics of Sri Lanka tourism
  • Movements and accommodation industry, revenue and employment in Sri Lanka tourism

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Boniface B. G. and Chris C., 2005: Worldwide Destinations: The Geography of Travel

and Tourism, Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford.

Boo, E., 1990, Ecotourism: The Potentials and Pitfalls, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC

Dhar P. N., 2006: International Tourism: Emerging Challenges and Future Prospects,

Kanishka, New Delhi.

Hall M. and Stephan P., 2006: Geography of Tourism and Recreation – Environment,

Place and Space, Routledge, London.

Lloyd E. Hudman and Richard H Jac kson, 2002, Geography of Travel & Tourism

McIntosh, R.W., 1977, Tourism: Principles, Practices and Philosophies, 2nd edition, Grid Inc., Ohio

Mendis, E.D.L., 1981, The Economic, Social and Cultural Impact of Tourism on Sri Lanka

Pearce, D.G, 1995, Tourism Today: A Geographical Analysis, 2nd Edition, Longman Group, New York

Robinson, H, 1976, A Geography of Tourism, Macdonald and Evans, London

Williams, Stephen 2007,Tourism Geography, Routledge

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41464

Title                                         : Bio Geography  

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will be able to understand the factors governing and limiting a species' distribution, evolution, factors governing biodiversity, ecosystem dynamics. They will also identify major biomes and zoogeographic provinces of the planet. In addition, they will be associated with field methods in biogeography.

 

Course Content:

  • Scope, content, development, definitions and concepts of biogeography
  • Nature of biosphere and its subsystems
  • Eco-systems and environmental limitations: light, heat, energy, moisture, wind and topography
  • Bio geographical processes and bio geographical patterns
  • Ecological biogeography: organisms and habitats, ecological niches, biological environments, bio climatology, topography and life, energy flow, food chain and food web, bio cycles (bio chemical, hydrological, carbon, nitrogen, mineral, oxygen), bio synthesis and bio degradation
  • Composite systems in the biosphere, evolution of soil, properties of soli, organic and physical properties of soil
  • Plant systems: evolution, diversity, grouping, associations, speciation and extinction, dispersal, colonization and invasion, plant communities in Sri Lanka
  • Animal systems: evolution, types, compositions and characteristics, animal communities in Sri Lanka
  • Domestication of plants and animals, man’s role in changing the biosphere, factors influencing distribution of plants and animals;
  • Biodiversity: definitions and scales, degradation and conservation;
  • Problems of deforestation and conservation; social forestry; agro-forestry; wild life; conservation biogeography: conserving species, communities and eco systems
  • Techniques and methods in biogeography, field surveys, vegetation mapping, remote sensing

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Eyr, S.R., 1971, Vegetation and Soil, Arnolds, London

Huggett,  Richard John, 2004, Fundamentals of Biogeography, Routledge    

MacDonald, Glen, 2003, Biogeography: Introduction to Space, Time, and Life, John Wiley & Sons Inc, USA 

Purly, P.A. and Newey, W.U.K, 1983, Geography of the Biosphere

Watts, D, 1997, Principles of Biogeography, McGraw Hill, London

Whittaker, R.M., 1996, Communities and Ecosystems, McMillan,  London

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core  

Course Code                            : GEOG 41474

Title                                         : Environmental Hazards and Disaster Management  

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course, the students will learn the geographical overview of the field of hazard and disaster studies. It encompasses a wide range of aspects, from the definition and assessment, vulnerable situations to the disaster management continuum. To underline the importance of disasters in socio-economic development, this course also makes assessments of the consequences of ‘natural’ disasters. It tends to provide the students with knowledge on hazard reduction and vulnerability mitigation. Concepts will be learnt through case studies from Sri Lanka, other developing and industrialized countries.

 

Course Content:

  • Conceptual background: need for hazard and disaster studies, historical background on hazard and disaster research, definitions and characterization of hazards, vulnerability and risk, disasters in a historical perspective
  • Indicators and factors of vulnerability
  • Vulnerability in the developing world
  • Urban centers as disaster prone areas
  • Disaster management and response: crisis situation, recovery and rehabilitation period
  • Impact of natural disasters: direct and short-term impact, indirect and long-term consequences, disaster as an opportunity for development
  • Hazard and vulnerability reduction: hazard prevention and vulnerability mitigation, hazard and disaster policy making, techniques and methods to assess hazard, vulnerability and risk

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Dhyani, S.N, 1994, Management of Environmental Hazards

Hewitt, K., 1997, Regions of risk: A geographical introduction to disasters. Longman, Harlow.

Keith, Smith, 1993, Environmental Hazards Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster, London

Ward, R.C., 1978, Floods: A Geographical Perspective, McMillan, London

White, G.F., 1974, Natural Hazards: Local, National, Global, Oxford University Press, New York

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 41484

Title                                         : Hydrology and Water Resource Management  

 

Learning Outcomes: The course will focus on human uses of and impacts on water resources with an emphasis on principles of water resource management. Understanding the interrelationships among land-use, soil, water, and people will also be addressed. The students will explore how management and planning can be used to minimize adverse impacts of human activities on water resources..

 

Course Content:

  • Hydrology : definition  and its importance, hydrological cycle, hydrological equation and its components.
  • The earth and atmosphere. air circulation, fronts, the importance of temperature, humidity and wind in hydrological studies.
  • Evaporation: definition, the process, factors affecting evaporation, water budget, energy budget and control of evaporation.
  • Transpiration: definition, factors affecting. Evapotranspiration, definition, Factors affecting
  • Precipitation: definition, forms, types of precipitation, factors affecting precipitation.
  • Infiltration: definition, mechanism, factors affecting infiltration, run of process.
  • Floods: causes and effects importance of flood studies, factors affecting flood.
  • Ground water: ground water movement.
  • Irrigation: advantages and disadvantages, types of irrigation, classification of irrigation schemes. Tank & lift irrigation.
  • Requirements of water : crop seasons, irrigation efficiency

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Brooks, K.N., Ffolloitt, P.F., Gregersen, H.M. and DeBano, L.F., 2003. Hydrology and the Management of Watersheds, 3rd Ed., Iowa State Press, USA.  .

Dzurik, A.A., 2002. Water Resources Planning. Rowman & Littlefield La

 

 

Level 4  -  Semester 2

 

Social and Economic Geography Stream

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 42415

Title                                         : Philosophy of Geography

 

Learning Outcomes: This course is designed to provide the students with an integrated view of the discipline of geography and to improve their understanding of the subject by taking into consideration its history, traditions, concepts, theories, branches, practitioners, and changing technology. Besides offering an overview of the discipline and the current "state of the art," this course also focuses on the nature of geography as a professional field and dimensions of being a geographer, including those opportunities relevant to successful employment.

 

Course Content:

The broad topics of interest include:

  • History and evolution of geography
  • Geographic thought: concepts, themes and standards
  • Methodological developments in geography
  • Geographic fieldwork
  • Role of professional organizations and associations in Geography
  • Geographic resources
  • Employment opportunities for geographers

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

To meet its objectives, this course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the issues of the field and other fundamental information, while student projects and presentations, discussions, writing assignments will accumulate additional knowledge.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Abler, Ronald, Adams John S. and Gould Peter, 1972, Spatial Organization: The Geographer’s View of the World, Prentice Hall International Inc., London

Castree, Noel,  Alisdair Rogers & Douglas Sherman, 2005, Questioning Geography: Fundamental Debates, Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Getis Arthur, Judith Getis , Jerome Fellmann,  2006, Introduction to Geography 12th Edition

Gersmehl, Phil, 2005, Teaching Geography, The Guilford Press, New York

Hartshorne, Richard, 1959, Perspective on the Nature of Geography, Rand McNally and Co., Chicago

Harvey, Milton E and Holly, Brian P., 1983, Themes in Geographic Thought, Croom Helm, London

Johnston, R.J. , 1979, Geography and Geographers, Edward Arnold, London

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 42424

Title                                         : Cultural Geography  

 

Learning Outcomes: This course introduces the students to the study of how various aspects of human culture are expressed spatially, including language, religion, economic organization, forms of government, and use of land. They will be familiarized with the major themes and debates within cultural geography, acquire skills in the interpretation of space and place in a variety of cultural geographical materials, develop analytical skills for interpreting human landscape and understand the human landscape as an expression of cultural forces.

 

Course Content:

  • Culture and Introduction to Cultural Geography and its relevance 
  • Theoretical approaches: materialism, Marxism, feminism
  • Nature and culture
  • Culture and identity
  • Landscapes: economic, political, religious, ethnic
  • Geography of Religion
  • Geo linguistics
  • Ethnic Geography
  • Geo Demography
  • Geography of gender
  • Transnationalism

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Donald Mitchell, 2000,Cultural Geography: A Critical Introduction, Blackwell Publishers Ltd, USA 

Jordan-Bychkov, Terry, and Mona Domosh, 2003, The Human Mosaic: A Thematic Introduction to Cultural Geography, New York: W.H. Freeman and Company.

Rubenstein, James M. 2007, The Cultural Landscape: An Introduction to Human Geography 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 43438

Title                                         : Dissertation  

 

Learning Outcomes: The dissertation forms a major part of the Special Degree providing students with an opportunity to bring together their learning in the conduct and presentation of a research. The students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained throughout the degree programme and apply them to a specific research question. They will be able to formulate a research proposal justifying the methodology, develop a study from a body of literature, carrying out a study, and make a contribution to the literature.

 

Course Content:

Although this unit does not include lectures on formal topics, they will spend their time in two major components. Firstly, they will attend the Dissertation Training Workshop which is intended for students to gain skills in the design of conceptually logical and methodologically accurate dissertation proposals. The Workshop has an emphasis on topics that relate to development issues in Sri Lanka. Secondly, they will engage in a study constituting extensive field work, lab work and supervision.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This unit requires a high degree of responsibility and independence on the part of the student in the execution of a research. Students will receive a guidelines booklet and should attend a briefing session at the start of the unit. The dissertation should be based on a topic chosen by students and should be approved by the Head of the Department. All work submitted must be their original work.

 

Although the dissertation must be produced independently, they will be encouraged to work in peer groups. Once students have completed their proposal, they will receive feedback. The supervision is regular and should be continued until the dissertation is submitted for the evaluation.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s dissertation will be evaluated on the basis of performance of following broad categories:

 05%

Regular and continuous meetings with the supervisor (See Table 1.1)

30%

Formulation of the problem, methodology and collection of data

30%

Analysis of data and reasoning 

35%

Presentation of data including conclusions and references

 

Recommended Reading:

Bouma, G.D. & Atkinson, G.B.J. (1995) A Handbook of Social Science Research, Oxford University Press

Hart, C. (2001) Doing a Literature Search: A comprehensive guide for the social sciences, Sage

Rudestam K. & Newton,R. (2000) Surviving Your Dissertation: a comprehensive guide to content and process, Sage (2nd edition)

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Geography Stream

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 42415

Title                                         : Philosophy of Geography

 

Learning Outcomes: This course is designed to provide the students with an integrated view of the discipline of geography and to improve their understanding of the subject by taking into consideration its history, traditions, concepts, theories, branches, practitioners, and changing technology. Besides offering an overview of the discipline and the current "state of the art," this course also focuses on the nature of geography as a professional field and dimensions of being a geographer, including those opportunities relevant to successful employment.

 

Course Content:

The broad topics of interest include:

  • History and evolution of geography
  • Geographic thought: concepts, themes and standards
  • Methodological developments in geography
  • Geographic fieldwork
  • Role of professional organizations and associations in Geography
  • Geographic resources
  • Employment opportunities for geographers

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

To meet its objectives, this course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the issues of the field and other fundamental information, while student projects and presentations, discussions, writing assignments will accumulate additional knowledge.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Abler, Ronald, Adams John S. and Gould Peter, 1972, Spatial Organization: The Geographer’s View of the World, Prentice Hall International Inc., London

Castree, Noel,  Alisdair Rogers & Douglas Sherman, 2005, Questioning Geography: Fundamental Debates, Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Getis Arthur, Judith Getis , Jerome Fellmann,  2006, Introduction to Geography 12th Edition

Gersmehl, Phil, 2005, Teaching Geography, The Guilford Press, New York

Hartshorne, Richard, 1959, Perspective on the Nature of Geography, Rand McNally and Co., Chicago

Harvey, Milton E and Holly, Brian P., 1983, Themes in Geographic Thought, Croom Helm, London

Johnston, R.J. , 1979, Geography and Geographers, Edward Arnold, London

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core 

Course Code                            : GEOG 42444

Title                                         : Global Environmental Systems  

 

Learning Outcomes: The ultimate goal in studying this course is to understand and explain past changes present trends and predict the future of environmental systems. The students will become proficient in the concepts about global environmental systems, and learn the importance of environmental system processes by using fundamental principles.

 

Course Content:

  • Scope of environmental geography
  • Global cycles and systems
  • Ecosystems and bioclimatic environments
  • Agriculture, and soil erosion
  • Energy: sources, uses and environment
  • Climate and global warming, managing the global climate
  • Air pollution: patterns, trends and impacts
  • Precipitation, land use and water resources
  • Water pollution: types, sources and controls,
  • Waste management: consequences, regulations and recycling
  • Soil and land: soil properties and processes, soil erosion
  • Biological diversity: trends, threats and protection
  • Open land resources: forests, grasslands and shrub lands, exploitation and conservation
  • Managing the global environment: international institutions managing the environment, monitoring environmental change,

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course will be presented with lectures and discussions; case studies and projects; readings on current local, national, and international issues.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance (See Table 1.1)

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Elizabeth Berner and Robert Berner, 2001, Global Environment: Water, Air and Geochemical Cycles, Prentice Hall

Harris, Frances, 2004, Global Environmental Issues, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, England 

Michael Manning and Lee R. Kump, 2009. Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming

Purly, P.A. and Newey, W. U. K., 1983, Geography of the Biosphere

William M. Marsh and John Grossa, 2005, Environmental Geography: Science, Land Use, and Earth Systems, John Wiley & Sons Inc, USA .

Watts, D., 1997, Principles of Biogeography, McGraw Hill, London

Whittaker, R.M., 1996, Communities and Ecosystems, McMillan, London

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : GEOG 43438

Title                                         : Dissertation  

 

Learning Outcomes: The dissertation forms a major part of the Special Degree providing students with an opportunity to bring together their learning in the conduct and presentation of a research. The students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained throughout the degree programme and apply them to a specific research question. They will be able to formulate a research proposal justifying the methodology, develop a study from a body of literature, carrying out a study, and make a contribution to the literature.

 

Course Content:

Although this unit does not include lectures on formal topics, they will spend their time in two major components. Firstly, they will attend the Dissertation Training Workshop which is intended for students to gain skills in the design of conceptually logical and methodologically accurate dissertation proposals. The Workshop has an emphasis on topics that relate to development issues in Sri Lanka. Secondly, they will engage in a study constituting extensive field work, lab work and supervision.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

This unit requires a high degree of responsibility and independence on the part of the student in the execution of a research. Students will receive a guidelines booklet and should attend a briefing session at the start of the unit. The dissertation should be based on a topic chosen by students and should be approved by the Head of the Department. All work submitted must be their original work.

 

Although the dissertation must be produced independently, they will be encouraged to work in peer groups. Once students have completed their proposal, they will receive feedback. The supervision is regular and should be continued until the dissertation is submitted for the evaluation.

 

Assessment Procedure:

Student’s dissertation will be evaluated on the basis of performance of following broad categories:

 05%

Regular and continuous meetings with the supervisor

30%

Formulation of the problem, methodology and collection of data

30%

Analysis of data and reasoning 

35%

Presentation of data including conclusions and references

 

Recommended Reading:

Bouma, G.D. & Atkinson, G.B.J. (1995).  A Handbook of Social Science Research, Oxford University Press

Hart, C. (2001) Doing a Literature Search: A comprehensive guide for the social sciences, Sage

Rudestam K. & Newton,R. (2000) Surviving Your Dissertation: a comprehensive guide to content and process, Sage (2nd edition).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Geography

 

 

Academic Staff :

 

 

Senior Professor R.K.L.M. Dharmasiri  -  Professor of Geography

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  MA (SKU, India), PG Dip.,  M Sc. (AUN. Norway),  PhD (Pune, India)

 

Dr. A.G. Amarasinghe   - Senior Lecturer I 

BA Hons (P’deniya), M.Phil (P'deniya) , PhD (Kelaniya)

 

Dr. Nishan Sakalasooriya   - Senior Lecturer I   (Head of the Department)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  MSSc. (Kelaniya), PhD (Kelaniya / Minnesota)

 

Mrs. W.V.W.G. Waniganeththi   -   Senior Lecturer I  (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  M DS (Colombo)

 

Mrs. W.V.N. Fernando  -   Senior Lecturer II   (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSSc (Kelaniya)

 

Mrs. S.R.L.S. Ratnasekera  - Senior Lecturer II

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSSc (Kelaniya)

 

Mrs. K.A.S.S. Wijesekara - Senior Lecturer II

BA Hons. (Colombo),  MSc.(Peradeniya)

 

Mrs. S.P.D.R. Senarathne -  Lecturer   (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya)

 

Mr. H.A.S. Arunashantha  - Lecturer (Probationary)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),MSc (SJP)

 

Mr. E.G.M. Jayarathne  - Lecturer  (Probationary)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSc (SJP)

 

 

 

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CONTACT US

Department of Geography

University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya 11600,

Sri Lanka

+094 (112) 903 920

info@kln.ac.lk

                                                        

© COPYRIGHT RESERVED BY DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, UNIVERSITY OF KELANIYA - SRI LANKA. DESIGN BY SAMPATH ARUNASHANTHA.

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