B.A. (Hons) Development Studies

 

 

 

1.1  Introduction

 

Development Studies is a multi-disciplinary area of academic enquiry, which examines the theories and practices associated with inequalities in world development. Development Studies is concerned with the understanding and analysis of processes which are transforming people’s lives throughout the world. It is concerned with the processes and relationships between people and institutions at different scales. Particular attention is paid to the relationships between ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ societies, the roles played by various institutions within them, and their effects on processes of social, political, economic and environmental transformation

 

The Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Kelaniya, in its response to the need for improving its curriculum of the Special Degree Programme, has set out a common framework for the allocation of credits on different course units. The Faculty undertakes this initiative in collaboration with the World Bank funded project of IRQUE-QEF − Batch 3.

 

The curriculum development programme – in particular the Special Degree Programme − has been regarded as a long felt necessity in the faculty due to the demand for improving the “employability” of the graduates who are able to engage themselves in productive occupations being engaged in national and international undertakings. Then it has also addressed the demand for producing graduates with better “quality” in terms of their academic qualifications and related merits.

 

In view of the necessity for curriculum development, the Development Studies Stream in the Department of Geography, Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Kelaniya has gone through the Outcomes-Based Curriculum Development (OBCD) programme which contains a series of steps in the development of a curriculum. All two streams, (a) development Studies (general course), and (b) development Studies (special Course) were examined under the curriculum development process.

 

1.2        Department Vision

 

The Department of Geography envisages;  “to create and maintain a challenging and intellectually vital learning community that engages students and faculty in continuing discourse, with focus on active, informed, productive, and creative, open-minded, and ethically responsible professional training and citizenship in a complex, multicultural world in which change and spatial variation are natural phenomena”.

 

 

 1.3        Department Mission

 

The Department of Geography expects; “to provide students with an overview of the discipline, specific skills that will help them in their future careers, and knowledge that will help them organize and maintain an effective philosophy of life that reflects an understanding of their natural and cultural surroundings”.

 

1.4        Assessment methods

 

Student’s grade in each of course will be determined as follows: While the structure is quite similar to the existing assessment procedure, in order to encourage the students’ attendance in the class, 5% of the total marks will be allocated for attendance.

 

1.5        Teaching and Learning Outcomes

 

The teaching and learning outcomes of each course unit were identified on basis of Bloom's Taxonomy. It is summarized in Annex 3.

 

Percentage

            Marks

80<

5%

80 – 70

4%

70 – 60

3%

60 – 50

2%

50 – 40

1%

40>

0

                                                                                                              

 

    1.1 Table - Class Attendance

 

5%

Class Attendance: details of the class attendance  method is in table 1.1

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.6        STRUCTURE OF THE SILABI AND CREDIT ALLOCATION

 

A total of 127 credits are allocated among 31 units in the Special Degree Programme. The complete syllabi presented in the Annex 01 have been summarized according to the credit allocation in Table 1.

 

Accordingly, at the level 1, students can follow 2 units in Development Studies if they wish to be considered for the Special Degree Programme from level 2 onwards. At the level 2 and 3, students should follow at least 16 core units and 01 auxiliary unit offered by the Department of Geography and 01 auxiliary unit offered by other Departments in the Faculty. In the 2nd semester of level 3, students will be placed in internship/institutional training which is also a core unit. At level 4, consists of 8 core units including the dissertation.

 

 

Table 1:Summary of Credit Allocation

Level

Semester

Credits

Number of Units

Total Credits

Core

Aux.

2

1

16

2

11

38

2

18

2

3

1

21

2

10

39

2

16

 

4

1

19

-

08

36

2

17

-

Total

106

08

29

113

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LEVEL

 

SEMESTER

 

CODE

 

COURSE UNIT

 

TYPE

 

CREDIT

TOTAL CREDITS

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

DVST 21414

Environment and Development

C

4

 

 

 

18

DVST 21424

Statistical Techniques for Development  Studies

C

4

DVST 21434

Gender and Development

C

4

DVST 21444

Human Resources and Development

C

4

DVST 21452/ **SSCG 21452

Map Reading

C/ A

2

 

 

 

2

DVST 22414/  GEOG 22414

Geographical Information Systems

C

4

 

 

 

18

DVST 22424

Poverty Analyses

C

4

DVST 22434

Changing Agrarian Societies

C

4

DVST 22442 / GEOG 22442

Survival Skills for Career planning

C

2

DVST 22454

Development  Planning I

C

4

SSCH 22452

History of Sri Lanka

A

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

DVST 31414

Development Theory and Reality

C

4

 

 

 

        23

DVST 31425 / GEOG 31425

Geography of Sri Lanka

C

5

DVST 31433 / MACO 31413

Development Communication

     C

3

DVST 31444

GEOG 31444

Regional Studies: India and China 

C

4

DVST 31455

Population and Development

C

5

SSCL 31442

Information Skills for Self Learning

A

2

 

              2

 

DVST 32414

Peace and Development

C

4

 

 

 

 

16

DVST 32424

Research Methodology in Development Studies

C

4

DVST 32434 / GEOG 32434

Internship/Institutional training

C

4

DVST 32444

Development Planning II

C

4

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

1

 

DVST 41414

Globalisation and International Integration

C

4

 

 

 

19

DVST 41423/ GEOG 41423

Independent GIS Project

C

3

DVST 41434

Development Experiences of Sri Lanka

C

4

DVST 41444 / GEOG 41444

Rural Development in the Developing World

C

4

DVST 41454

NGOs and other Organisations in Development

C

4

 

2

DVST 42415

Evaluations of Development Strategies

C

5

    

     17

DVST 42424

Global Shifts in Development Focus

C

4

DVST 43438

Dissertation  

C

8

** for non – Geography Students                                                           

Development Studies 

                         

 

                  Level 02  -   Semester 01

 

 

 

Type/ Status:                Core

Course Code:                DVST 21414

Title:                             Environment and Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit is concerned with the nexus between, on the one hand, the economic growth and social development and, on the other, the sustainability of the environment. It aims, first, to provide the student with knowledge that concerns conventional economic growth that has ramifications for the environment. In this the attention will be paid to the phenomenon known as ‘externalisation of the environment costs’ in production.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key indicators of environmental degradation and deterioration. Then they should be able to identify different ways the environmental problems manifest themselves in different regions of the world and their different consequences for the world and the human habitat in short- and in long-term. Further they should also be able to consider ways and means remedying these problems both from individual and from institutional levels. Finally they should be able to identify and argue in support of the ways and means to promote environmentally sustainable economic growth and social development.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of the nexus between environment and development, Environment (and the eco-system) as a living body, Human activity (at least in part) as an energy intensive enterprise, Population expansion is one which exerts pressure upon environment.

 

Major environmental problems caused due to:

Energy intensive industrial production (that produces quantities of industrial pollutions and waste materials as by-products), Energy intensive agricultural production (that exerts pressure on land, water and atmospheric resources) , Energy intensive mode of transport (as expanding population has, for the most part in urban areas, differentiated location of living from that of their economic activity), Energy intensive mode of living (energy intensive goods and services upon which many have become dependent), Need to restructure economic development policies and the legislature in order to assuage human impact on environment (Examination of “cost externalisation” versus “cost internalisation”),  National and global strategies that are in place for assuaging the adverse impact of human activity on environment

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Bartelmus, P., (1994), Environment, Growth and Development: The Concepts and Strategies of Sustainability. Routledge, London

Southern Tier East Regional Planning Board. (1974), Environmental Goals and Development Policies. The Board, Cornell University

United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, (1992), Report of the United

Nations Conference on Environment and Development: “Agenda 21”. New York.

United Nations Conference on Environment and Development,(2007) ,Report of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: “Earth Report”. New York.

World Commission on Environment and Development, (1987),The Report of the World commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future, Oxford University Press, Oxford

 

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 21424

Title:                            Statistical Techniques for Development Studies

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with statistical techniques usable in Development Studies. Statistical techniques in here are those operations, research or programming techniques which help in the decision making process in Development Studies. Thus, they supplement guesswork and intuition.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and use the key statistical (quantitative) methods in the analysis of data and information that pertain with Development Studies. They should also be able to identify the limitations to quantitative methods. However, when and where possible, the student will learn the relevance and significance of statistical techniques in sufficing their statements sound support in the area of their studies in Development Studies.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich the understanding of development of the industrially advanced countries, Methods of collecting data and information, Classification and tabulation of collected data, Probability theory and sampling. Correlation and regression analysis, Time series analysis, Interpolation and extrapolation, Survey techniques and methodology, Ratio analysis, Statistical quality control, Analysis of  variance. Statistical inference and interpretations, Theory of attributes.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilises a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects and discussions.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Gupta prem kumar, Hira D.S, (2005), Operations Research, S.Chand and company LTD, New Delhi.

Freedman pisani purres, David Robet roger, (2006), Statistics, WW. Norton and sons, New York

Grant E ugene L. , Levavenworth Richard S., (2007), Statistical Quality Control, M. C Graw – Hill companies, New York.

Gupta, R.C, (2003), Statistical quality control, Khanna Pulishers, Delhi.

Kothari, C.R., (1984), Quantitative techniques, (Third revised edition) Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd., India.

Van Maanen, John (ed) (1979) Quantitative Methodology, SAGE Publications, New Delhi.

Y.P. Agrawal, (1998), Statistical methods: concepts, application ad computation, sterling publishers, New Delhi.

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 21434

Title:                            Gender and Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student with knowledge of the gender issue in its relation to structure and form of social organisations and economic activities. This focuses both of the diachronic and synchronic approaches to understanding of gender issues as they concern people in different societies and cultures.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key factors that contribute to gender issue and argue, where appropriate, about gender differentiation and gender discrimination. They should also be able to identify and elaborate on eradication of gender differentiation and discrimination and thus improve individual, family and social well-being, on the one hand, and for economic growth, social, cultural and educational development, on the other.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student about intricate relations between the gender status as perceived by people and the economic growth and social development, Gender issue with reference to gender differentiation and gender discrimination as an issue that has consequence for all genders, variations in gender differentiation and gender discrimination between different cultures and social systems: (1) matriarchal, and (2) patriarchal cultures.

Processes and mechanisms of gender discrimination and economic disenfranchisement and political disempowerment, Gender differentiation and gender discrimination and its connection with family violence and tension in closely knit communities. Incongruity between, on the one hand, gender discrimination and, on the other, economic growth and social development. (To discriminate a person is to deviate from the basic social science (economic) axiom which states that ‘every individual is utility maximising, rational person’. To discriminate one people on the basis of his/her gender, thus, is irrational and counter productive to well-being of the person who discriminates other)

Individual and institutional measures taken (or may be taken) in eradication of gender differentiation and gender discrimination, Examples to cases where eradication (at least partially) of gender differentiation and gender discrimination has been possible and which has promoted a greater degree of social and economic well-being within concerned households and in the societies

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial  -1

10%

Tutorial  -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Arya, Sadhna , (2006), Poverty, gender and migration. Published by SAGE

Bhagawat Vidyat, (2004), Feminist Social thought an introduction six key thinkers

Rawat Publications, Jaipur.

Brush, Lisa D, (2007), Gender and Governance: Rawat Publications, Jaipur.

Cranny-Francis Anne, Wendy Elizabeth Waring, Wendy Waring, Joan Kirby, Pam

Parpart  Jane L.  , Connelly, M. Patricia, Barriteau, V. Eudine, (2000), Theoretical Perspectives on Gender and Development, The International Development and Research Center , Canada .

Sarkar  Aanchal, (2006) Gender and Development, Pragun Pblisher , India

Saunders Kriemild , (2004), Feminist post- development thought rethinking modernity, post colonialism and representation , Zed Books, London.

Stavropolous , (2003), Gender Studies: Terms and Debates. Published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Stearns Peter N,  (2006), Gender in World history, Rutledge Publishers, New York.

Watkins Susan Alice, Rueda Marisa, Marta Rodriguez , (1992) , Feminism for beginners: Icon Books Ltd, Cambridge.

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 21444

Title:                             Human Resources and Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student with understanding of the nexus between, on the one hand, the human resources, and on the other, development, and its variations between countries. This focuses on understanding of the social, economic and legislative reasons for variation in Human Resources between countries and regions and of the structural problems in the labour market within countries.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss significance of human resources for development in the labour market within a country i.e. Sri Lanka. Then they should also be able to identify and elaborate on key factors that have contributed to differentiation in human resources and variation in development achievements within countries and between countries and regions.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of human resources and its link with development, Constituents of human resources, The nexus between, on the one hand, the formal education and/or on-the-job-training and, on the other, the development of human resources, The nexus between, on the one hand, the development of technology, and on the other, the human resources. (Discuss the DNA-spiral-ladder shaped dependent relationship between technological development and skills development through a cycle of skilling, de-skilling and re-skilling).  The nexus between health and human resource development (thesis of conventional institutionalist theory of Myrdal). Efficacy of the legislative factors (policies) for human resource development, Economic and social factors for development of human resources. Variation in human resources between different countries as they have consequences for economic growth and social development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial –2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:         

Chaturredi, Inakshi., (2000), Human Development and globalization , deep and deep New Delhi

Harich edi., (2006), Human Resource Development theories and practices, A sanka publishing house, New Delhi

Hossain Moazzem, Iyanatul Islam, Reza Kibria,  (1999), South Asian economic development: transformation, opportunities and challenges. Published by Routledge

Human Development report, (2008), Oxford University press,  New York

Jakubauskas, Edward B., C. Phillip Baumel , (1967),  Human resources development. Published by Iowa State University Press (Original from the University of California)

Pant S.K., (2006), Human Develpoment: Consept and issues in the context of Globalization, Rawat,  India

Yuvaraj S., (2003), Human Resource Development, Vrinda, Delhi

 

 

 

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core/ Auxiliary

Course Code                            : DVST 21452 / SSCG 21452

Title                                         : Map Reading

 

Learning Outcome:

The purpose of this course is to develop basic skills in cartographic presentations. The students will learn their skills in both topographic map reading and preparing thematic presentations. They will be able to interpret Sri Lanka topographic maps. 

 

Course Content:

 

History, definitions and scope of Cartography, Objectives of cartography,                                   

Types of maps: Topographic maps and Thematic maps, Reading the topographic map of Sri Lanka, Representation of socioeconomic data using thematic maps, Common features and elements of a map, Latitudes and longitudes and projections, Introduction to GIS, remote sensing and GPS

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: As this unit is designed to teach basic cartographic skills, lectures as well as practical work equally constitute the course.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

 10%

Tutorial 

 25%

Practical based assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Campbell, J., (1991),  Introduction to Cartography. 2nd ed. Dubuque, Ia.: Wm. C. Brown.

Campbell, J., (2001) , Map Use & Analysis. 4th ed. McGraw Hill

Guptill, C.  (1995), Elements of Cartography, Wiley

Monmomier, Mark, (1993), Mapping it Out, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago

Robinson, Arthur H., Joel L. Morrison, Phillip C. Muehrcke, A. Jon Kimerling, Stephen

 

 

 

Level  02 - Semester 02

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:               DVST 22414/GEOG 22414

Title:                             Geographical Information Systems

 

Learning Outcomes: The main aim of this course is to focus on the fundamental concepts of GIS including map projections, and nature of geospatial data; application of various analyses of geospatial data; computer architecture and file systems; making maps and presenting findings; developing a perseverance in solution of complex computer algorithms. On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to describe the fundamental components of a GIS; define system specifications including projections, data and process modeling; organize, using appropriate data structures, geographic data within a GIS; analyze data and prepare digital databases using GIS software; and summarize, using maps and tables, the results of GIS based analyses.   

 

Course Content: Topics to be covered include; Introduction to GIS: definitions, components of GIS, factors supporting the rise of GIS, philosophy of GIS, advantages of GIS,  Maps and GIS: definitions, map essentials, types of maps, map data, spatial data, spatial data coordinate systems, map projections, Universal Transverse Mercator Projection (UTM)

 

Digital representation of geographic data, data base and data base management

Models in GIS: Raster and Vector data base, data quality and data standards, data capturing and processing, Raster and Vector base data capturing systems, processing and analyzing techniques, Structures in GIS: Vector data structure, Raster data structure, comparison between Vector and Raster data structures, advantages and disadvantages

 

Visualization of GIS data: cartography in the context of GIS, digital terracing modeling, spatial analysis, IS application: computerized mapping, and spatial analysis, major areas of application, Fundamentals of remote sensing: definitions, satellite remote sensing process, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, passive and active sensing, characteristics of images, Satellite and sensors: satellite characteristics-orbits and swaths, characterization of satellite remote sensing systems, Image interpretation and analysis: visual interpretation, digital image processing

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course work consists of lectures, power point presentations, reading suggested materials, handouts, class discussions and lab work.

 

Assessment Scheme:

 

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial  (Practical )

25%

Lab Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht Jochen, (2007), Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London.

Bernhardsen Tor, (1999), Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York.

Chrisman Nicholas, R, (1996), Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York.

David Bruce, (1996), GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

Michael N. Demers, (2000), Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems,  Second Edition

Ratnayake, Ranitha, (2009), Fundamentals of Remote Sensing:Interpretation and Application, Author Publication,First Edition.  Shrestha Basanta, Birendra Bajracharya,  Sushil Pradhan, GIS for Beginners, (2001), Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Nepal

           

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 22424

Title:                             Poverty Analyses

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with concept of poverty, different forms of poverty, and poverty as it manifests in different regions within one country (i.e. Sri Lanka), and, in different parts of the world.  Then it focuses on the emergence of poverty as a national and global issue – from ‘alienation of the worker from his/her means of production’ and how this process has been perpetuated in different parts of the world.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the constituents of power (absolute poverty, relative poverty, “poverty of culture”), factors that give emergence to poverty, factors that contribute to perpetuation of poverty, and the measures taken by local, international (i.e. Oxfarm) and supra-national (i.e. the UN) bodies in eradication of poverty. Then the student should also be able to discover and examine regional and global variations in relative and absolute poverty.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of the poverty and the causes for its perpetuity.

Poverty and of different forms of poverty (in particular, absolute poverty and relative poverty), participatory poverty measures (poverty mapping), Factors that have contributed to pauperisation of some (alienation of the worker from the means of production) and its significance and relevance (transition from feudalism to market economy),  Extent to which the market economy is capable of eradicating poverty without institutional interferences (competition and free market leads to ‘factor-price equalisation’),  Institutional factors that hinder eradication of poverty, Measures taken by local, national, regional and supra-national bodies and organisations for eradication of poverty, ‘Foreign aid’ earmarked for eradication of poverty in poor countries, Entrenchment of poverty in sub-Saharan Africa whilst poverty has been reduced (as a share of the population) in Emerging Economies, i.e. India and China, A possible link between economic growth and poverty eradication.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Klugman Jeni,  (2002),  A Sourcebook for Poverty Reduction Strategies. World Bank, New York.

Nagy Hanna Nagy, (2008), Transforming government and empowering communities: the Sri lankan experience with e-development. World Bank Publications.

Quibria Muhammad Ghulam, (1993), Rural poverty in Asia: priority issues and policy options. Oxford University Press

Rodgers Gerry, José B. Figueiredo, Rolph van der Hoeven, Zafar Shaheed, (1995), New Approaches to Poverty Analysis and Policy. International Institute for Labour Studies,

World Bank ,(1998). Poverty reduction and the World Bank: progress in fiscal 1998. World Bank Publications

 

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 22434

Title:                             Changing Agrarian Societies

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with structure of the agrarian societies and their forms of change over time with reference to some industrially developed and industrially less developed countries. This focuses both of the diachronic and synchronic approaches to understanding of these countries.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key factors that have contributed to the changing structure of the agrarian societies in different countries and regions of the world. They should also be able to identify the variations in this process between countries particularly those that are industrially advanced and others that are less so. Then they should be able to identify and discuss the significance of this change that the agrarian societies undergo for growth and development of the overall economies.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of the factors that contribute to changing of the agrarian societies and their significance.

Agrarian societies (plantation agriculture, subsistence agriculture, market oriented agriculture, family farming versus agricultural cooperatives) as a special category of social organisation, Significance of agriculture for overall growth of the economy of the concerned countries (through agricultural forward and backward linkages), Reasons as to why some countries depend relatively more on agriculture activities whilst their dependence on other activities is relatively low (Conventional knowledge on agrarian development, political economy perspective),  The shift of the agricultural societies systems of subsistence agriculture to systems of market oriented agriculture (de-aggrarianisation and de-peasantisation as processes), Peasant movements in other industrially less advanced countries of Asia, Africa and South America. The “Liontief paradox” and its significance for development of the agricultural societies. The nexus between the agriculture, animal husbandry and self-sufficiency in food, Agricultural societies as the suppliers of industrial raw materials (i.e. bio fuel) and its ramifications for food security in industrially less developed countries

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search. Students’ project is based on a field survey.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment / Field Survey

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Conkin, Paul K., (2008), A Revolution Down on the Farm: The Transformation of American Agriculture Since, ( 1929), University Press of Kentucky 

Grigg, David, (1984), An Introduction to Agricultural Geography, Huthinson University press, New York

Grigg, D.B., (1990), Population Growth and Agrarian Change: A Historical Perspective, Cambridge

Peiris, G.H.,(1996), Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, Macmillan India Ltd, New Delhi

Peiris, G.H., (2006), Sri Lanka: Challenges of the New Millennium, Kandy Books, Kandy

Reddy, Ravinder M., (2004), Technological Transformation in Indian Agriculture

United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (2007) Report of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: “Earth Report”. New York.

VStanis, V. F, (1976), The Socialist Transformation of Agriculture: Theory and Practice  

Wilson Jim & Jenny Coxon ,(1988), Changing Agriculture: An Introduction to Systems Thinking. Kangaroo Press.

Zanden, J. L. and J. L. Van Zanden, (1993), The Transformation of European Agriculture in the Nineteenth Century: The Case of the Netherlands

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 22442 /GEOG 22442

Title:                            Survival Skills for Career Planning

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit is designed to demonstrate the value of developing personal attributes and to examine the transferable skills to be acquired by the students during their university life. With the comprehension of these attributes and skills, it is expected that the students should be able to discover successful employment opportunities and a productive social life.

 

Course Content:

The course constitutes following components: Assessing personal goals, abilities, needs, values and interests.  Models on career planning ,Job search and Holland's theory of career choice, Applying for jobs using a resume (CV) and cover letter, Facing the interviews for available positions, Considering the job offers, its options and opportunities, Plan and implement a program for Career development, Resources of career development: local and global,  Improving awareness on problems, Career counseling and mentoring,  Taking appropriate action and decision-making, Assessing the performance, Understanding career pathways and career connections

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:  This course will integrate elements of Problem-based Learning (PBL) with traditional classroom activities. PBL is a way to engage interest in the material, to promote deeper learning, to help the students remember what they are learning, and to promote lifelong capacities in problem-solving and critical thinking.

 

Assessment Scheme:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial

25%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Ashley, Roderic, (1998), Enhancing Your Employability

Smale, Bob and Julie Fowlie, (2008), How to Succeed at University: An Essential Guide to Academic Skills and Personal Development (Sage Study Skills Series)

Sukiennik, Diane, William Bendat, Lisa Raufman, (2007), The Career Fitness Program: Exercising Your Options, Eighth Edition, Pearson-Prentice Hall

 

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 22454

Title:                             Development Planning I

 

Learning Outcomes: This course Unit Provide the Students with knowledge and experience in understanding rationale of development planning in the context of different politico- economic system. The students must be able to know about planning

 

process and different perspectives and process of development planning emphasis is given to make the Students aware of new trend of planning with special reference to the different levels of administration and public participation at the end of the course the student may gain know now in designing planning and evaluating development plan for third world countries with reference to    Sri Lanka.

 

Course Content:

 

Principles and Practices of Development Planning:

Evolution of planning ideology in different politico-economic systems (capitalist and Socialist): planning in free-market economies, closed economies planning models of classical economics (Tinbergen and others) central planning ideology and strategies, GOELRO (Lenin’s planning intervention) and subsequent developments in central planning. Economic planning in India: Objectives and strategies. Economic planning in Sri Lanka since independence.

 

Planning Process:

Diagnosis stage(identification of problems, analysis and verifyng) Policy formulation, Goals setting ,evaluation and actions, legal, administrative and  participatory procedures. Contents and structure of development plans, forecasting models. Linear programming, threshold analysis. Budgeting and time frame. Public consultation and validation.

Components of development plans (i) Current economic condition survey, (ii) Proposed public expenditure, (iii) share of the private sector,(iv)  macro economic projections of the economy, (v) government policy  ie. Private sector, state sector, mixed.

 

Development Planning and Governance:

Centralized vs decentralized   processes of   planning and implementation. Administrative hierarchy, local authorities and public participation. Participatory planning tools. Development policy statements of different political systems, manifestos and action plans of different political regimes in Sri Lanka. (upto Mahinda Chinthana)

 

Economic Planning:

Definitions, principles and tools, Rationale of  development planning, Planning  as a cyclical process; stages and actions, Approaches and techniques in planning; vision/need/ scheme oriented planning ,perspective planning, Master plan to projects, process of  planning(conceptualization and  formulation of actions),Types of planning, national accounting and budgeting, policy making and planning ,evolution of planning institutions from planning council to National Planning Department and Ministry of Planning.

 

Development Planning and Spatial Policy:

Geography and Planning (Freeman to Krugman) spatial organization for development, location theories, spatial processes and models. Regional economics in planning.(Alonso and  Isard, Losch, Hoover…..)Regionalisation for development planning.

 

Physical / Spatial Planning:

Town planning to regional and national physical planning, land use planning, Environmental planning, (landscape planning) and area development plans.

 

Regional Planning:

Evolution of Regional Planning [in the developed and developing countries]. Ideologies and strategies.Regional and central planning, planning regions and different types of regional plans. planning for backward area development. {Ex.-Nagenahira Navodaya, Uthuru Wasanthaya etc}

 

Plan Implementation:

Phasing implementation,Authorities and organizations, hierarchy of responsibilities and functions. Organizational structure of implementing agencies, satutary powers of

implementing agencies. Implementation processes. Political commitment in implementation. role of  line agencies, operational cell(of the ministry of planning)district  planning sec.(National and district level coordination strategies) IRDP, Mahaweli Authority, UDA and other implementing agencies and their functions)

 

 

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment /Field Survey

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Department of National Planning ,(2001), Planning technique (realization the vision) Ministry of Financial Planning Colombo, Sri Lanka

Freeman T.W , (1974), Geography and Planning, Hutchinson Publication ,United Kingdom.

Mathur B.L., (2008), Economic Planning and Development, Sublime Publication.

Rural Development Principle Polices Management, (1999), New Delhi, Katar Singh, Sage Publication

 

 

 

Level 03  -  Semester 01

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 31414

Title:                            Development Theory and Reality

 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with compatibility / discord between development theory and “reality” (empirical situation of the world of today). This focuses on economic growth and social development in a selected number of countries (some least developed countries from sub-Saharan Africa, low income countries of Asia and Emerging Economies of Asia) and on some economic growth/development theories as Classical Growth Model, Two Sector Growth Model (Arthur Lewis), Export-Lead Theory, Import-Substitution Theory, Stage Theory of Rostow, Dependency Theory (Andre Gunder Frank), Institutional Theory (North and Fogel).

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key factors that have contributed to stagnation/sluggish/growth of the developing economies with reference to various economic growth/development theories. They should also discover and examine variations in growth figures (hence development endeavour) from one period to another in Sri Lanka.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of compatibility / discord between major development theories and the empirical situation of the world of today, Growth / development indicators and discuss their relevance and significance in reference to (1) least developed countries, (2) low income countries, (3) middle income countries and (4) emerging economies (i.e. China), Main constituents of these growth/ development theories (including (1) Classical Growth Model (2) Two Sector Growth Model (3) Export Lead Theory (4) Stage Theory of Rostow (5) Import-Substitution theory (6) Dependency Theory (7) Institutional Theory), Can these theories/models be globally applicable, Globalisation as a unifying model that explains economic growth and social development ,Incongruity of status between the least developed countries of sub-Saharan Africa and the emerging economies of Asia, Indigenous technological knowledge in the industrially less advanced countries in development and technology transfer.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment /Field Survey

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Crewe  Emma , Harrison  Elizabeth,  (1998), Whose Development? An Ethnography of Aid, Zed Books Ltd, London.

Hettne Bjorn , (1995), Development Theory and the Three World. Towards an International Political Economy of Development,  Longmans, London

Jameson, Kenneth B & Wilbur, Charles . (ed) , 1979),  Directions in Economic Development, University of Notre dam Press,  London.

Leys, C., (1996), The Rise and Fall of Development Theory, James Curry. London

Nabunere, Dani W., (1997), Beyond Modernization and Development or Why the Poor Reject Development. Geographiska annaler

Preston, P., (1996), Development Theory, Blackwell, Oxford

 

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 31425 / GEOG 31425

Title:                            Geography of Sri Lanka

 

Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the students are expected at gaining a comprehensive knowledge on key geographical issues and, ability to associate its relationship with the development process in Sri Lanka.  They will also analyze the changing patterns of geographical issues in a broader temporal and spatial scale and further explain their causes and consequences.

 

Course Content: The topics include: Physical environment, of location and geography on Sri Lanka’s development, Socio economic landscape shaped by colonization, spatial patterns of socio economic characteristics, Land use patterns, irrigation and agriculture Settlement patterns and urbanization, ‘Post-independence’ development and ‘post-war on terror’ challenges, Natural hazards and disaster management, Development in Sri Lanka in the context of regional and global dynamics, Development projects in backward areas

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: To meet its objectives, this course employs a variety of teaching modes. Lectures provide much of the major issues of the course and, students will learn other information through a field study and presentations, discussions, writing assignments and internet search.

 

 

Assessment Scheme:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial -1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment Based on a Field Study

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Brun, Catherine & Tariq Jazeel, (2009), Spatialising politics: Culture and Geography in Postcolonial Sri Lanka, SAGE Publications India Pvt. Ltd,

Domroes, M., and H. Roth, eds, (1998), Sri Lanka—Past and Present: Archaeology, Geography, Economics, Weikersheim, Germany: Margraf.

Grover, Paul, A, (1996), Economic Development and Social Change in Sri Lanka: Spatial and Policy Analysis, Manohan Publishers, New Delhi.

Johnson, B. L. C., and M. Le Scrivenor, (1981), Sri Lanka: Land, People, and Economy ,London: Heinemann.

Lakshman, W.D, (1997), Dilemmas of Development: Fifty Years of Economic Change in Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka Association of Economists, Colombo

Peiris, G. H., (1996), Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, New Delhi: Macmillan.

 

Jayakody,Sarath K,(2008), Sri Lanka: Sustainable development,Challenges and Responses.An Overview on the Development Problems and Potentitals of Sri lanka from a global context, Author Publication.

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 31433 / MACO 31413

Title:                            Development Communication

 

Learning Outcomes:  At the end of the unit student should be able to: Apply various theories connected with the study of development communication and its application to the study of Mass communication. The student will have the chance to evaluate the nature, growth and trends in the field of development communication

Course Content: What is development? Perspectives of development, concept of development and Development Communication, sustainable development, Colonization and development, Behavior Change Communication(BCC),development projects(local/international) ,mass media and national development, development and community, development and traditional media, modern trends and concepts of development communication, Rural Development,  Urbanization, Industrialization, Westernization, Modernization, Globalization 

 

Teaching and Learning Outcome: 

Lectures, Tutorials, Workshops , Field Visits , Demonstrations , Surveys

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

20%

Assignments

20%

Field Survey

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Lerner ,D (1958),The Passing of Traditional society , N.Y. Free press.

Lerner ,Daniel and Wilber Schramm ,(1967) Communication and change in the developing Countries ,Honolulu ,East West learner press.

Jayaweera Neville, Amunugama Srath (ed) (1987), Rethinking Development Communication, AMIC, Singapore. 

Schramm ,W (1964),Mass Media and National Development, Stanford University press.

 

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 31445

Title:                            Population and Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with demographic shifts and its links with economic growth and social development and in doing so, it will refer to data and information from both countries with progressive population pyramids as well as those with regressive population pyramids. Then it will draw the attention to also those countries i.e. China and Vietnam where worker-dependent ratio (the number of dependents, on average, per worker) is going to increase.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss various national, regional and local demographic shifts and transitions and the factors

 

that have contributed to them. Then they should be able to discuss the relevance and significance of sustainable population size that allow sustainable economic growth and social progress.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich the understanding of the student of population and demographic shifts and its influence on economic growth and social development, Definition of economically sustainable size of population (optimum size of population), Population measured in terms of literacy and vocational skills, Difference between absolute size of population and population density of different countries, Content of the term ‘population is a resource’ and its significance for economies which experiences serious consequences of unemployment, under-employment and quasi employment, Distinction between total growth and per capita growth of the economies with reference data and information from countries of Asia (including Sri Lanka) and elsewhere, Regressive population pyramids and its implication in countries like China for worker-dependent ratio

Survey of Japan (or any other country of same situation) as an example for people rich but resource poor country which was able to achieve rapid economic growth and social progress.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Cuffaro Nadia, (2001), Population economic growth and agriculture in less development countries, Routledge Publishers, London.

Hawthorn Geoffrey, (1978), Population and development,  Published by Rutledge Publishers

United Nations, (2003),  Population and development: selected issue , . Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, United Nations.

World Bank (1994). Population and Development: Implications for the World Bank. Published by World Bank Publications.

 

 

 

Level 03  - Semester 02

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 32414

Title:                            Peace and Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with cohesiveness in relations between, on the one hand, peace and stability and, on the other, economic growth and social development. It seeks help student understand that countries at war are forced to endure economic stagnation.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss how war drains the budget of the country and thus makes it difficult for the nation to invest in necessary institutional and infrastructure whilst the private sector finds it hard to find stability necessary to continue with investment activities. They should also discover and examine examples of countries that have avoided war and thus have been able to secure high economic growth and social development. 

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of the benevolent influence that peace has on development, Define peace as a precondition for economic growth and social development – discuss if absence of instability and war the same as peace, Direct and indirect costs of war and conflicts, Ways in which lack of social stability and peace contribute to economic and social retardation, Examples of countries where social instability and war (civil war) have contributed to deprivation of the economy and society from necessary investments and development endeavour, Cessation of cessation of war (civil war) required to resurrection of economic activities, “Peace dividends” and economic growth and social development in Sri Lanka

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Raman B. , Moorthy Sathiya N., Chittaranjan Kalpana (eds.), (2006), Sri Lanka, Peace without process, Vijitha Yapa publications.

Samaddar Ranbir (ed.), (2009), Peace Studies: An introduction to the concept, scopes and themes, Sage publications, New Delhi.

Uyangoda Jayadeva , Perera Morina, (2003), Sri Lanka Peace Process- 2002,

Social Scientist’s Associaation publications, Colombo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Type/Status:                   Core

Course Code:                 DVST 32424 / GEOG 32424

Title:                              Regional Studies: India and China 

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with the uniqueness and diversity of both physical and human geography in India and China. Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to distinguish and discuss the interaction between the physical environment, human settlement, development, and problems of the nations in India and China. Students should also discover and examine the success of regional development strategies in both countries in their own context.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich the understanding of India and China.

Region and regional geography, India and China as unique and diverse regions, Physical Setting, History, politics, social structure, and traditions of India and China, Utilization of natural resources,   Agriculture, Industrialization and development, Migration, Globalisation and development.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial  -1

10%

Tutorial  -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Ahmed Sadiq, (2007), India’s Long –Term Growth experience: Lessons and prospects, sage publication,  New Delhi.

Dasgupta, Biplab, (2005), Globalisation: India’s Adjust experience , Sage Publication, New Delhi

Drezesen, Jean edi, Amarty edi, (1998), Indian development selected regional perspectives Oxford University Press, Delhi.

Harrison Henrietta, (2001), China, Hodder neadline group, London

Kynge James., (2006), China Shakes the World:  A Titan’s Troubled Future and the Challenge for America, Haughton Mifflin Company, New York .

James Laurenceson , Joseph Chal-, “Financial Reform & economic Development in China’’ Edward Elgar Publication.

Nayar, Baldov, Ral, (2001), Globalization and Nationalism The changing balance in Indian’s policy 1950-2006, Sage Publication, New Delhi

Meredith Robyn, (2007), The Elephant and the Dragon: the Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us,  W.W. Norton & Company Inc., New York .

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 32434 /GEOG 32434

Title:                             Internship / Institutional training

 

Learning Outcomes: This training is designed to give the students opportunity of learning to work in a selected institution that is consistent with the field of Development Studies, under the supervision of an employer and a coordinating lecturer. The aim of this training which is to be acquired outside of the university environment is to get “total work experience” with the world of work. Students who successfully complete this training will demonstrate their familiarity with intellectual skills, transferable skills and excellent personal attributes.   

 

 Course Content: The internship would essentially include the “total work experience” on the following:  Problem solving and decision making,, service learning and customer care, Keeping records and use of resources, IT skills and communication skills, Community service, social skills, nurturing relationships and volunteering, Leadership, responsible citizenship and truthfulness, Contributions to group efforts and teamwork, Time-management, Self-motivation, attendance and punctuality, Coping with uncertainty, flexibility and conflict resolution Concern for others, empathy and sharing 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: The student, Coordinator, and Employer will file monthly progress/evaluation reports, attend arranged meetings on the “total work experience”.

 

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this unit will be determined as follows: The student must work a minimum of 240 hours for the 15 week-semester to receive the four credit hours.

 

30%

Attendance - average of 16 hours per week

30%

Employer rating on the “total work experience” 

40%

Project Assignment

 

Recommended Reading:

No textbook is required for this unit.

On-site training materials and guidelines may be provided by the employer.

The student should comply with all work regulations of the employer.

The employer and the student will sign an agreement on duties, working hours, workdays, payments, if any, time off, etc. 

 

 

Type/Status :                 Core

Course Code:                DVST 32444

Title:                             Development Planning II        

 

Learning Outcomes: This Course unit provides the students with experience in formulation an appraisal of development project using the conventional tools and technique. He /She may gain a through knowledge in analysis of cost and benefit of development project and monitoring the progress. The qualitative and quantitative methods in valuation of (progress) resinous. Development programs will be tested in the real world situation to improve the expected skills on the subject.

                                                                                                        

Course Content: Evaluation of Development Plans: Pre-Planning stage evaluation,(before selecting alternatives after goal setting) feasibility  evaluation of proposed actions) setting tools for evaluation, monitoring and on-going evaluation. Terminal and ex- post evaluation and external evaluation procedures. Evaluation as a multidisciplinary process, Qualitative and Quantitative methods in Evaluation: RRA and PRA, financial and economic analysis (of projects mainly), Evaluation reports ( structure and organization)

 

Project Formulation and appraisal: Development of   project idea, Project formulation, Evaluation and diversification. Types   of origin of projects. Project cycle, Project feasibility, logical framework for project formulation, EIA and SIA procedures, legal and institutional arrangements, techniques. Finical, economic, Social and environmental CB analysis. UNIDO, WB and other approaches, Extended CB analysis (of ADB) Network analysis (critical path method) other project selection methods eg., financial VS economic and social benefits.

Monitoring and Evaluation:

 

 

Feedback of the course:

  1. Preparation of a development plan for a sector/region or a community.
  2. Evaluation of a development plan/programme/project.

3  Ex- post Evaluation of projects

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This Course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, Students projects, discussions and Internet search

 

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Chandra, P.(1987), Projects Preparation Appraisal, Budgeting and implementation, New York, Tata, Mc Graw Hill.

Dasgupta,P, Sen A. K. and Marglin, S., (1972),Guide Line for projects Evaluation, New York, United Nations, Industrial development Organization.

Lester,A ., (1991) ,Project Planning and Control ,Second Edition, Butterworth ,Heinemann. 

 

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 32454

Title:                             Research Methodology in Development Studies

 

Learning Outcomes: By undertaking this course unit, the students will be able to explain the way in which research is conducted which may be envisioned of in terms of the research philosophy, discover the research strategy to be employed and, apply the best research instruments to be utilized in the pursuit of goals in their own research projects and the quest for the solution of a research problem.

 

Course Content: Philosophy and the purpose of scientific approach, Research: applications, definitions, characteristics and types, Ethical considerations and stakeholders, Problem formulation: rationale and objectives, Literature review and plagiarism,  Identification of variables and measurements, Constructing hypotheses: functions, characteristics and types,  Research design: functions and selection, Sampling: principles and types, Instruments for data collection by primary and secondary sources, Bias, validity, reliability and accuracy of data and instruments, Data processing: editing, coding, frame of analysis, role of statistics, Data display: tables, graphs and diagrams, Proposal writing, Report writing and referencing and making verbal presentations

 

Teaching and Learning Outcome:  Instruction for this course may be achieved through the use of the following: lectures, discussion of textual material on principles of research, practical lessons and assignments.

 

 Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

25%

Synopsis

10%

Synopsis based presentation

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Babbie Earl, (2004), The practice of social research 10th edition, Thomson Asia  pte. Ltd, Singapore.

Desai vandana, potter Robert B.(2006) Doing Development Research, sage publications, New Delhi.

Dharmasiri, L.M. 2009, Samajeeya Vidya Paryeshana, 3rd Edition, Author publication (in Sinhala)

Gomm, Roger, (2004), Social Research Methodology: A Critical Introduction, 2nd Edition, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.

Kothary, C. R., (2007), Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques,Vishwa Prakashana, New Delhi

Kumar, Ranjith, 1996, Research Methodology: A Step by Step Guide for Beginners, SAGE Publications Ltd, London

Laws Sophie, Harper Caroline, Marcus Rachel, (2003), Research for Development  , Vistaar publications, New Delhi.

 

 

Level 04 - Semester 01

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 41414

Title:                            Globalization and International Integration

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with structure and forms of global integration of the economies of the world and what came later to be known as globalisation. Then this focuses on envisaged (by the WTO and other proponents of the idea) and de facto benefits of globalisation for growth and development from diachronic and synchronic perspectives.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key constituents of globalisation as a phenomenon and as a process. Then they should be able to identify the major consequences of globalisation process. Finally, they should also recognise regional and national variations in benefits of globalisation.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of consequences of globalisation for economic growth and social development.

Key constituents of globalisation (with particular reference to integration of GATT into WTO),Historical process of globalisation (Can development of liberal trade regimes under colonial administration (similar to that followed by Colebrook-Cameroon commission of Sri Lanka) be termed as an early forms of globalisation?), Why globalisation was required (technical development and enlargement of industries and realisation of ‘scale economies’)

What was envisaged of achieving with globalisation (“factor price equalisation’)

Has globalisation been successful (compare Emerging Economies with those of sub-Saharan Africa), Is globalisation relevant and sufficient as an economic growth and social development model

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Carling Alan H., (2006), Globalization and identity: development and integration in a changing world, I.B.Tauris Press, (Chapter 6 is about Sri Lanka)

Dasgupta kiely, samir (2006) Globalisation and after, Sage Publication, New Delhi.

Goldin Reinsert, Ian Kennert, (2006), Globalization for development, Rawat Publications, Jaipur.

Gopinath C., (2008) Globalization: A multidimensional system, Sage Pulication, New Delhi.

Justin, (2001), Globalization, Spinney Press.

Kar samit, (2005), Globlisation: one world, many voice, Rawat Publisher, India

Kiely Ray & Phil Marfleet, (1998),Globalisation and the Third World, Routledge Publisher, London.

Milward Bob,  (2003), Globalisation?: Internationalisation and Monopoly Capitalism : Historical Processes and Capitalist Dynamism. Edward Elgar Publishing.

Mishra Ramesh ,(1999), Globalization and the welfare state, Edward, elgar, Cheltenham.

Sebastian Thomas, (2007), Globalization and under development neocolonialism, Maltinational cooperation space and society ,Pawat Pulisher, Jaipur

 

 

Type/Status:                  Core

Course Code:                DVST 41423 / GEOG 41423

Title:                             Independent GIS Project

 

Learning Outcomes:  The students will be exposed to an independent GIS project which applies theory, methods and techniques learnt in the Unit of Geographical Information Systems. The unit mainly focuses on how to make GIS applications in different contexts. On successful completion of the course, the students will be able to understand the applications of GIS in specific spatial contexts, and to assemble, manipulate and analyze data relevant to a particular research issue.

 

Course Content: The topics available are flexible and the students are allowed to select and design their own project under the supervision. To support the selection and work on a particular topic, following aspects will be covered in the unit.

Design of a GIS project,  Geo spatial data applicable to GIS projects, Application of spatial and non-spatial data, Planning and implementation of a GIS project, Processing of field data and remote sensing data, Preparation of a GIS report.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures, seminars, fieldwork and presentations.

 

Assessment Scheme:

Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

35%

GIS Report

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Albrecht Jochen, (2007), Key Concepts and Techniques in GIS, SAGE Publications Ltd, London .

Bernhardsen Tor, (1999), Geographic Information Systems: An Introduction, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York.

Chrisman Nicholas, R, (1996), Exploring Geographic Information Systems, John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York.

David, Bruce, (1996), GIS: A Visual Approach, Santa Fe: Onward Press

Shrestha, Basanta, Birendra Bajracharya and Sushil Pradhan, (2001), GIS for Beginners, Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Nepal

 

 

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 41434

Title:                            Development Experiences of Sri Lanka

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with economic growth and social development experiences of Sri Lanka over the years, from a diachronic perspective, from colonial times to the present day, and then from a synchronic perspective, with present day development experiences.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and explain different historical phases of economic growth and social development of Sri Lanka through (1) plantation activities centred export orientation, (2) agriculture small holdings and small scale fishing activities orientation, (3) extensive reliance on FDI and export orientation through EPZs, and (4) labour export orientation. They should also examine policies whose purpose has been to provide stimuli for growth and development.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of development experiences of Sri Lanka from diachronic, synchronic and from policy perspectives, Definitions of growth and development in Sri Lankan context

Internal and external situations and circumstances that affected development policy making, Development strategy and policy of Sri Lanka, Development policy making of Sri Lanka and development theory (traditionally, open economic models with right wing parties and closed or managed economic models with left-wing parties), Export orientation as a managed policy – middle path of economics, Obstacles to growth and development of Sri Lanka

Success so far achieved in terms of growth and development.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial –2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Hossain Moazzem, Iyanatul Islam, Reza Kibria (1999). South Asian economic development: transformation, opportunities and challenges. Published by Routledge Publisher, London .

Jayakody,Sarath K,(2008), Sri Lanka: Sustainable development,Challenges and Responses.An Overview on the Development Problems and Potentitals of Sri lanka from a global context, Author Publication.

Lakshman, W.D, (1997), Dilemmas of Development: Fifty Years of Economic Change in Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka Association of Economists, Colombo.

Peiris, G. H., (1996), Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives, New Delhi: Macmillan.

United Nations Development Programme: National Human Development Report: Regional Dimensions of Human Development, Sri Lanka, Colombo.

 

 

 

 

 

Type/ Status                             : Core 

Course Code                            : DVST 41444 / GEOG 41444

Title                                         : Rural Development in the Developing World

 

Learning Outcomes: By following this course which presents the concept of rural development more as a process, the students are expected to critically examine the key concepts associated with rural development policies and, and to use these concepts in analyzing the reality, revealing the intricacies of rural development. The students will also study the challenges facing popular ideals associated with rural development.

 

Course Content:

Concepts associated with rural development in the developing countries, Growth and development, Industrialization and economic growth, Growth, distribution, equity and poverty, Theories and models of rural development, State and the development, Development strategies, Agricultural change and rural development, Trade, transnational corporations and development, Labour market patterns, women’s participation and rural development

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The teaching methods include lectures and discussions, writing tutorials and assignment, data collection & analysis using the secondary sources.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Chambers, R., 1983, Rural Development: Putting the Last First, Pearson Education Ltd, England

Dixon,  Chris, 1990, Rural Development in the Third World, Routledge

James Valentine Udoh, 1991, Urban and Rural Development in Third World Countries: Problems of Population in Developing Nations

Kambhampati, Uma S., 2004, Development and the Developing World: An Introduction, Blackwell Publishing Inc, USA 

McAreavey, Ruth, 2009, Rural Development Theory and Practice, Routledge 

 

 

 

Type/ Status:                Core

Course Code:               DVST 41454

Title:                            NGOs and other Organisations in Development

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with organisation and management of national and international organisations in development. This focuses on identification and characterisation of these organisations.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key factors that identify both national and international organisations in development. They should also discover and examine their ideological whereabouts, goals of achieving and mode of operations in LDCs like Sri Lanka.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of national and international organisations in development,  Non-governmental organisations in development i.e. Sarvodaya, Gramodaya, Kibutz and Grameen Bank Project and various

 

Cooperative Movements and their goals, Non-governmental organisations in development and their mode of operations i.e. emergency aid, structural aid, humanitarian, etc. International organisations in development i.e. bi-lateral organisations, trilateral organisations, multilateral organisations and the survey of their goals,  International organisations in development and their mode of operations i.e. emergency aid, structural aid, etc. International organisations in development and their role in national policy making (through i.e. tied aid, project aid, humanitarian aid, emergency aid, structural aid, etc.)

Extent to which the policies of international organisations in development are relevant and harmonious with the culture and the social and economic circumstances of the country

 

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

 

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial –2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Deborah Eade, (2000), Development, NGO and civil Society, Rawat, India.

Jhn Farrington, David J Lewis, (1993) Non government Origination and the State in Asia Rethinking Roles in Sustainable Agricultural Development, Rout ledge Publisher.

Lewis Ravichandran David, (2008), NGO and Social welfare: new research approaches, Rawat, India.

Luman Cromwell White, (2007), International non- Governmental Origination: Their purposes, Methods and accomplishments, Rutgers University Press Roger Riddel, Mark Robinson,(1995), Non-Governmental Organizations and rural Poverty alleviation,  Oxford University press.

 

 

 

Level 04 -  Semester 02

 

Type/Status:                 Core

Course Code:               DVST 42415

Title:                            Evaluations of Development Strategies

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with development evaluations with particular reference to industrially less developed countries. This focuses on both economic growth and social development of the concerned nations and regions.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify and discuss the key factors that have contributed to growth and development of Sri Lanka and of other concerned economies and societies. In this they should be able to utilise growth and development theories appropriately. They should also discover and examine regional variations in growth and development processes amongst them.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich the student in their attempt to appreciate development achievements with reference to available data and information and to concerned theories, Constituents of development evaluation, Identification of development evaluation processes, Application of theory in development evaluation, Identification of key development indicators (from a country like Sri Lanka),  Measurements of development of evaluation, Interpretation of development evaluation and identification of its relevance and significance for the nation.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

Recommended Reading:

Reese Laura Ann ,  David Fasenfest,  (2004), Critical evaluations of economic development policies, Wayne State University Press.

Reusse Eberhard (2002). The Ills of Aid: An Analysis of Third World Development Policies,  University of Chicago Press.

 Southern Tier East Regional Planning Board, (1974). Environmental Goals and Development Policies,  The Board, Cornell University

Todaro M.P., (2001),  Economic Development in the Third Wold ,New York & London

 

 

Type/Status      :           Core

Course Code    :           DVST 42424

Title                   :         Global Shifts in Development Focus

 

Learning Outcomes: This course unit aims to provide the student knowledge with global shifts in development endeavour. First this seeks to examine different foci in different countries and regions of the world. Then it also seeks to examine shifts in development foci from a diachronic perspective.

 

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to identify shifts in global development foci. Then the student should be able to discuss the key factors that have contributed to global shifts in development foci in space and in time. Finally the student should be able to contemporary goals of global development focus.

 

Course Content: Following sections will enrich understanding of the student of global shifts in development foci and the factors that have motivated them, Development foci and their shift in time and space, Development foci – population issue, employment issue, health issue, food issues, security issues, financial crises and economic stagnation and, environment issues,   Relevance and significance of development foci for growth and development,  The issue of why and who sets the agenda concerning the shift development foci – single (powerful) nations, G8 (then G8 and G20), BRIC nations, G70 nations, various UN bodies, EU and NATO countries, etc. Consequences of these shifts in foci for growth and development (as in the case with cutting back on carbon dioxide emission and the development endeavour of the industrially less developed countries.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This course utilizes a variety of teaching modes including lectures, student projects, discussions and Internet search.

 

Assessment Scheme: Student’s grade in this course will be determined as follows:

  5%

Class Attendance

10%

Tutorial –1

10%

Tutorial -2

15%

Assignment

60%

Semester End Examination

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Bosa mc Neill, Motren , (2004), Global Institutions and Development , Rutledge Publisher, London

Dicken  Peter, (2009), Global shift mapping the changing contour of the world economy , Sage Publication new Delhi.

Gilpin Robert, (2003), Global political economy: understanding the International economic order orient Longman economic order, Orient Longman, Hyderabad

Ohmaekenichi, (1995), The end of the nation market: the rise of regional economies, Harper Collins publishers.

Taylor Paul, (2006), International organization in the age of Globalization viva, Singapore.

 

 

 

Type/Status                              : Core

Course Code                            : DVST / GEOG 43438

Title                                         : Dissertation  

 

Learning Outcomes: The dissertation forms a major part of the Special Degree providing students with an opportunity to bring together their learning in the conduct and presentation of a research. The students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained throughout the degree programme and apply them to a specific research question. They will be able to formulate a research proposal justifying the methodology, develop a study from a body of literature, carrying out a study, and make a contribution to the literature.

 

Course Content: Although this unit does not include lectures on formal topics, they will spend their time in two major components. Firstly, they will attend the Dissertation Training Workshop which is intended for students to gain skills in the design of conceptually logical and methodologically accurate dissertation proposals. The

 

Workshop has an emphasis on topics that relate to development issues in Sri Lanka. Secondly, they will engage in a study constituting extensive field work, lab work and supervision.

 

Methods of Teaching and Learning: This unit requires a high degree of responsibility and independence on the part of the student in the execution of a research. Students will receive a guidelines booklet and should attend a briefing session at the start of the unit. The dissertation should be based on a topic chosen by students and should be approved by the Head of the Department. All work submitted must be their original work.

Although the dissertation must be produced independently, they will be encouraged to work in peer groups. Once students have completed their proposal, they will receive feedback. The supervision is regular and should be continued until the dissertation is submitted for the evaluation.

 

 

 

Assessment Scheme:

 

Student’s dissertation will be evaluated on the basis of performance of following broad categories:

 

 05%

Regular and continuous meetings with the supervisor

30%

Formulation of the problem, methodology and collection of data

30%

Analysis of data and reasoning 

35%

Presentation of data including conclusions and references

 

 

Recommended Reading:

Bouma, G.D., Atkinson, G.B.J., (1995), A Handbook of Social Science Research, Oxford University Press

Hart, C. (2001) Doing a Literature Search: A comprehensive guide for the social sciences, Sage Publication, New Delhi

Rudestam K. & Newton,R., (2000), Surviving Your Dissertation: a comprehensive guide to content and process, Sage Publication, New Delhi (2nd edition).

Ranasinge Piyadasa, (2009), Instruction for compiling higher degree thesis, Third edition, Author Publication.

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Academic Staff :

 

Senior Professor R.K.L.M. Dharmasiri  -  Professor of Geography

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  MA (SKU, India), PG Dip.,  M Sc. (AUN. Norway),  PhD (Pune, India)

 

Dr. A.G. Amarasinghe   - Senior Lecturer I 

BA Hons (P’deniya), M.Phil (P'deniya) , PhD (Kelaniya)

 

Dr. Nishan Sakalasooriya   - Senior Lecturer I   (Head of the Department)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  MSSc. (Kelaniya), PhD (Kelaniya / Minnesota)

 

Mrs. W.V.W.G. Waniganeththi   -   Senior Lecturer I  (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),  M DS (Colombo)

 

Mrs. W.V.N. Fernando  -   Senior Lecturer II   (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSSc (Kelaniya)

 

Mrs. S.R.L.S. Ratnasekera  - Senior Lecturer II

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSSc (Kelaniya)

 

Mrs. K.A.S.S. Wijesekara - Senior Lecturer II

BA Hons. (Colombo),  MSc.(Peradeniya)

 

Mrs. S.P.D.R. Senarathne -  Lecturer   (Study Leave)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya)

 

Mr. H.A.S. Arunashantha  - Lecturer (Probationary)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya),MSc (SJP)

 

Mr. E.G.M. Jayarathne  - Lecturer  (Probationary)

BA Hons. (Kelaniya), MSc (SJP)

CONTACT US

Department of Geography

University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya 11600,

Sri Lanka

+094 (112) 903 920

info@kln.ac.lk

                                                        

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